Phantom II Basestation Manual

Phantom II Basestation Manual

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41.   41   |   Page     Figure   28  ‐  SNMP   Web   Page      

1.                         PHANTOM   II™   BASE   STATION         USER   MANUAL   PN   001 ‐ 5199 ‐ 200   REV   2   RELEASED   AUGUST   2011

25.   25   |   Page     Figure   19  ‐  Redundant   Base   Station   Setup   Wizard   4       Step   6:   The   Setup   Wizard   is   complete   and   the   Base   Station   is   ready   to   use.   Click   “ Finish ”.   Figure   20  ‐  Redundant   Base   Station   Setup   Wizard   Finish              

49.   49   |   Page       Figure   32  ‐  Simplified   Block   Diagram   of   Alarm   Port   Circuitry     6.11.2 CONFIGURING   THE   ALARM   PORT   The   web   page   is   used   to   configure   the   Alarm   Port   pins   and   to   monitor   the   status   of   input   lines.   Figure   33  ‐  Alarm   Port   web   page    

2. REVISION   HISTORY   REV   DATE   REVISION   DETAILS 0   January   7,   2011   Initial   Release.   1   March   7,   2011   Updated   most web   page   screen   shots. Added   information   about   SNMP   :   Section   6.8   Correct   Part   Numbers   in   Section   1.1.1   and   1.1.2   Removed   Multispeed   section.   2   August   29,   1011   QoS   sections   added,   6.9   and   6.10.            

7.   7   |   Page     1.1.1 PHANTOM   II   STANDARD   BASE   STATION   BLOCK   DIAGRAM   242 ‐ 5199 ‐ 200   The   figure   below   shows   a   simplified   block   diagram   of   a   Phantom   II   Standard   Base   Station.   The   Phantom   II   Standard   Base   Station   consists   of   a   Base   Station   Controller   board   and   one   Phantom   II   contained   in   a   3U   19”   rack   mountable   chassis.    Figure   1  ‐  Phantom   II   Standard   Base   Station   Block   Diagram        

35.   35   |   Page     Each   web   page   in   the   Setup   Wizard   contains   instructions   for   filling   out   the   required   information.   All   parameters   that   are   entered   through   the   Setup   Wizard   can   be   directly   accessed   later   by   loading   the   applicable   web   page   from   the   main   menu.   6.5 CONTROLLER   SETUP   (BASIC)   These   settings   pertain   to   various   settings   of   the   Base   Station’s   Controller.   Figure   25  ‐  Controller   Setup   (Basic)   Web   Page    

9.   9   |   Page     1.2.1 LED   PANEL   Figure   3  ‐  Standard   Base   Station   LED   Panel      Figure   4  ‐  Redundant   Base   Station   LED   Panel     As   shown   in   Figure   3,   the   front   panel   of   a   Standard   Base   Station   has   the   following   buttons:    Radio   On/Off     Alarm   On/Off    As   shown   in   Figure   4,   the   front   panels   of   a   Redundant   Base   Station   have   the   following   buttons:    Radio   Select     Alarm   On/Off   

28.   28   |   Page     4.2.3 RADIO   SETUP   FOR   A   REDUNDANT   SYSTEM   In   a   redundant   Phantom   II   system   both   Radio   A   and   Radio   B   must   be   setup   identically.   The   user   must   set   all   the   parameters   in   the   two   radios   identically.    The   two   radios   must   have   identical   local   Ethernet   IP   and   wireless   IP   addresses   (if   used).    Both   radios   must   have   the   same   Operation   Mode   and   Network   Name.    If   desired,   the   Radio   Description   in   the   two   radios   may   be   different.                                               

59.   59   |   Page     6.16.1 PRIMARY/SECONDARY   ADDRESS   PINGS    6.16.1.1 DESTINATION   IP   ADDRESS    This   field   displays   the   destination   IP   address   the   Controller   Board   is   attempting   to   ping.     6.16.1.2 ATTEMPTS    This   field   displays   the   number   of   attempted   pings   to   either   the   Primary   or   the   Secondary   IP   address.    6.16.1.3 SUCCESSFUL   PINGS   This   field   displays   the   number   of   successful   pings   to   either   the   Primary   or   the   Secondary   IP   address.    6.16.1.4 FAILED   PINGS    This   field   displays   the   number   of   failed   pings   to   either   the   Primary   or   the   Secondary   IP   address.

19.   19   |   Page     3.1.5 LAN   SETUP     STEP   1   From   the   Start   menu   on   your   PC,   select   Control   Panel    Network   Connections   STEP   2   Right   click   the   Local   Area   Connection   icon   to   open   the   Properties   box.   Scroll   through   the   list   and   highlight   Internet   Protocol   (TCP/IP).   Click   Properties   to   open   the   TCP/IP   Properties   box.   STEP   3   Enter   the   following   values   for   USE   THE   FOLLOWING   IP   ADDRESS:   IP   Address:   192.168.1.100   Subnet   Mask:   255.255.255.0   Default   Gateway:   (leave   empty)   STEP   4   Click   OK   to   apply   your   changes   and   complete   the   connection   process.     Figure   11  ‐  Computer   IP   Address   Setup           Step   1   Step   2   Step   3   Step   4  

29.   29   |   Page     5.0 FRONT   PANEL   LEDS   AND   BUTTONS   The   front   panel   of   the   Base   Station   has   an   LED   panel   with   2   push   buttons   and   up   to   17   LEDs.   Figure   21   below   shows   the   LED   Panel   of   a   Standard   Base   Station.   Figure   22   show   the   LED   Panel   of   a   Redundant   Base   Station.   Figure   21  ‐  Standard   Base   Station   LED   Panel     Figure   22  ‐  Redundant   Base   Station   LED   Panel      5.1 FRONT   PANEL   BUTTONS   The   Standard   Base   Station   has   two   buttons:   Radio   On/Off   and   Alarm   On/Off.   The   Redundant   Base   Station   also   has   two   buttons:   Radio   Select   and   Alarm   On/Off.   The   button   functions   are   listed   in   Table   8   below.    

44.   44   |   Page     6.8.3.3 ADD/DELETE   Click   the   Add   button   to   add   the   Trap   Sink   IP   and   the   Trap   Sink   Port   to   the   SNMP   Trap   Sink   List.   After   an   entry   has   been   added   to   the   list   a   “Delete”   link   is   displayed   next   to   the   entry.   Click   the   delete   link   to   remove   an   individual   entry   from   the   list.   6.9 QOS   The   Quality   of   Service   (QoS)   module   throttles   IP   traffic   sent   to   the   radio   network.   Note   that   only   traffic   from   the   LAN   to   the   radio   network   will   be   throttled.   Traffic   can   be   filtered   and   throttled   at   different   rates   using   the   QoS   filters.    Figure   29   –   QoS   Web   Page  

55.   55   |   Page     6.13.1.4 PASSWORD   Enter   the   password   needed   to   connect   to   the   radio.   6.13.1.5 RADIO   POWER   (STANDARD   BASE   STATION   ONLY)   This   setting   turns   the   power   on   or   off   to   the   radio.   This   option   is   only   available   on   the   Standard   Base   Station.   For   the   Redundant   Base   Station,   go   to   the   "Redundant   Setup"   web   page   to   control   which   radio   is   used.   6.14 RADIO   DIAGNOSTICS   The   Base   Station   Controller   connects   to   the   radios   to   monitor   the   radio’s   diagnostics   and   overall   health.   The   radio’s   diagnostics   are   reported   on   this   webpage.    Figure   37  ‐  Radio   Diagnostics   web   page     6.14.1 RADIO   STATUS    6.14.1.1 RADIO   IN   USE   This   field   displays   which   radio   is   currently   in   use.   

65.   65   |   Page                                             ABOUT   CALAMP   CalAmp   is   a   leading   provider   of   wireless   communications   products   that   enable   anytime/anywhere   access   to   critical   information,   data   and   entertainment   content.   With   comprehensive   capabilities   ranging   from   product   design   and   development   through   volume   production,   CalAmp   delivers   cost ‐ effective   high   quality   solutions   to   a   broad   array   of   customers   and   end   markets.   CalAmp   is   the   leading   supplier   of   Direct   Broadcast   Satellite   (DBS)   outdoor   customer   premise   equipment   to   the   U.S.   satellite   television   market.   The   Company   also   provides   wireless   data   communication   solutions   for   the   telemetry   and   asset   tracking   markets,   private   wireless   networks,   public   safety   communications   and   critical   infrastructure   and   process   control   applications.   For   additional   information,   please   visit   the   Company’s   website   at   www.calamp.com .    

37.   37   |   Page     6.5.3 RADIUS   SETTINGS   6.5.3.1 RADIUS   AUTHENTICATION   Enable   or   disable   RADIUS   authentication   for   webpage   access.   6.5.3.2 SERVER   IP   ADDRESS   The   IP   address   of   the   RADIUS   server.   6.5.3.3 SERVER   PORT   The   port   of   the   server.   6.5.3.4 SERVER   SECRET   Sets   the   secret   phrase   to   use   with   the   server.   6.5.3.5 CONFIRM   SECRET   Re ‐ type   the   Server   Secret   to   confirm   spelling.   6.5.3.6 TIMEOUT   Specify   the   number   of   the   seconds   to   wait   before   a   retry.   6.5.3.7 RETRIES   Specify   the   number   of   attempts   at   authenticating   with   the   server   before   giving   up.   6.5.4 ALARM   SETTINGS   6.5.4.1 ALARM/BUZZER   This   setting   will   enable   or   disabled   the   audible   buzzer   located   on   the   Controller   Board.   Typically,   the   buzzer   will   beep   when   an   error   is   detected   with   the   Controller   Board   or   an   error   is   detected   with   a   radio   installed   in   the   Base   Station.           

12.   12   |   Page     Figure   5  ‐  Radio   I/O   Port   pin   out       1.2.6 POWER   CONNECTOR   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   is   supplied   with   a   right ‐ angle   power   connector   (11 ‐ 30   VDC)   and   60”   of   cable.   When   installing   the   power   cable,   trim   the   cable   as   short   as   possible   to   reduce   the   voltage   drop   through   the   wire.    The   power   connector   has   four   pins.   Only   pins   2   and   3   need   to   be   connected   for   normal   operation   (Main   Power   and   Ground).   Pins   1   and   4   are   auxiliary   power   connections   and   do   not   normally   need   to   be   connected.   These   pins   are   wired   directly   to   an   internal   power   connector   and   provide   an   easy   way   to   power   a   user’s   custom   PC   board,   RTU,   or   other   equipment   that   may   be   mounted   inside   the   Base   Station.   Figure   6  ‐  Power   Connector     1 4 3 2 1   2   3 4 5 6 7 8 1   2   3   4   5 6 7 8

48.   48   |   Page     Alternatively,   the   connections   to   Relay   2   can   also   be   used   as   digital   inputs   when   the   Relay   function   is   disabled.   Pin   7   is   not   connected   to   any   relays   and   can   be   used   as   a   digital   input,   digital   output   or   an   analog   input.   These   options   can   be   set   using   the   web   page   interface.    6.11.1 OVERVIEW   Figure   31   and   Figure   32   provide   a   pin   out   of   the   Alarm   I/O   connector   and   a   block   diagram   of   the   internal   circuitry.            Figure   31  ‐  Alarm   Port   pin   out       Pin   Function   1   Relay   2   (Normally   Open)   Digital   Input   1   2   Relay   1   (Normally   Open)    3   Relay   2   (Common)   4   Relay   1   (Common)   5   Relay   2   (Normally   Closed) Digital   Input   5   6   Relay   1   (Normally   Closed)   7   Digital   Input   or   Output   7   Analog   Input   7   8   Ground   1   2   3 5   7   4 6   8   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

33.   33   |   Page     6.3 HOME   The   Home   window   displays   the   Base   Station’s   general   and   diagnostic   information.    Figure   24  ‐  Redundant   Base   Station   Homepage   Status   Screen     6.3.1 CONTROLLER   ETHERNET   SETTINGS   6.3.1.1 IP   This   field   displays   the   Ethernet   IP   address   for   the   Base   Station   Controller.   The   IP   address   of   the   Base   Station   Controller   can   be   changed   on   the   Controller   Settings  ‐ >   Setup   (Basic)   web   page.   6.3.1.2 SUBNET   MASK   This   field   displays   the   Ethernet   subnet   mask   for   the   Base   Station   Controller.   The   subnet   mask   of   the   Base   Station   Controller   can   be   changed   on   the   Controller   Settings  ‐ >   Setup   (Basic)   web   page.   6.3.1.3 MAC   ADDRESS   Media   Access   Control   Address.   Every   Ethernet   device   (i.e.   LAN   cards)   has   a   unique   hardware   serial   number   or   MAC   address   to   identify   each   Network   Device   from   all   others.   This   number   is   programmed   at   the   factory   and   cannot   be   changed.  

21.   21   |   Page     Figure   12  ‐  Standard   Base   Station   Setup   Wizard   1      Step   4:   If   you   do   not   want   to   change   the   IP   address   of   the   Base   Station,   click   “ Next ”   now.   If   desired,   enter   in   a   new   IP   address   and   subnet   mask   for   the   Base   Station   Controller.   The   IP   address   of   the   Base   Station   Controller   must   be   different   than   the   Phantom   II’s   IP   address   but   must   be   on   the   same   IP   subnet   as   the   radio   inside   the   Base   Station.   When   the   IP   address   is   entered   correctly   click   the   “ Next ”   button   at   the   bottom   of   the   web   page.   The   IP   address   of   the   Base   Station   Controller   will   update   immediately.   A   new   browser   window   will   open   taking   you   to   the   third   setup   wizard   page.   You   will   need   to   re ‐ enter   the   login   credentials.    Figure   13  ‐  Standard   Base   Station   Setup   Wizard   2    

38.   38   |   Page     6.5.5 PERIODIC   RESET   TIMER    6.5.5.1 PERIODIC   RESET   TIMEOUT   This   field   sets   the   Periodic   Base   Station   Reset   time   from   15   to   65,535   minutes.   The   Periodic   Reset   is   disabled   when   set   to   0.   When   this   timer   expires,   the   Reset   Module   will   automatically   power   down   the   Base   Station   Controller   and   the   radios,   and   then   the   entire   system   will   be   rebooted.   6.6 CONTROLLER   DIAGNOSTICS   Local   Controller   diagnostics   can   be   accessed   by   loading   the   Controller   Diagnostics   webpage   from   the   main   menu   of   the   Base   Station’s   homepage.   Figure   26  ‐  Controller   Diagnostics   Web   Page     6.6.1.1 CONTROLLER   STATUS   Displays   the   current   status   of   the   Controller   Board   and   is   used   to   report   any   errors   detected   with   the   Controller   Board.   6.6.1.2 TEMPERATURE   This   field   displays   the   current   temperature   inside   the   Base   Station   in   degrees   Celsius.   6.6.1.3 INPUT   VOLTAGE   This   field   displays   the   current   input   voltage   to   the   Base   Station.  

54.   54   |   Page     6.13 RADIO   SETTINGS   This   configuration   screen   lists   the   settings   for   each   radio   in   the   Base   Station.   The   information   entered   here   will   be   used   by   the   Controller   Board   to   access   the   radio(s)   to   control   and   monitor   their   status.   Figure   36  ‐  Radio   Settings   web   page     6.13.1 RADIO   CONFIGURATION   This   configuration   screen   lists   the   settings   for   each   radio   in   the   Base   Station.   The   information   entered   here   will   be   used   by   the   Controller   Board   to   access   the   radio(s)   to   control   and   monitor   their   status.   6.13.1.1 RADIO   MODEL   This   setting   is   pre ‐ programmed   at   the   factory   and   displays   the   radio   model   that   is   present   in   the   Base   Station.   6.13.1.2 ETHERNET   IP   ADDRESS   Enter   the   IP   address   that   is   programmed   into   the   radio.   The   Controller   Board   will   use   this   IP   address   to   connect   to   the   radio.   6.13.1.3 USERNAME   Enter   the   username   needed   to   connect   to   the   radio.  

30.   30   |   Page       Table   8  ‐  Base   Station   LED   Functionality   Base   Station   Version   Button   Name Button   Function Standard   Base   Station   Radio   On/Off   Toggles   the   power   to   the   radio   on   and   off.   Alarm   On/Off   If   an   error   with   the   radio   is   detected   a   buzzer   on   the   Base   Station   Controller   will   sound.   This   button   disables   or   enables   the   alarm   buzzer.   Hold   button   down   for   5   seconds   to   clear   any   radio   errors.   You   will   hear   two   long   beeps   as   errors   are   cleared.   Redundant   Base   Station   Radio   Select   Cycles   through   the   modes   listed   below   to   turn   power   on   and   off   to   the   radios   and   to   select   Auto   or   Manual   Mode.   1) Radio A In Use, Auto Mode 2) Radio A In Use, Manual Mode 3) Radio B In Use, Auto Mode 4) Radio B In Use, Manual Mode Alarm   On/Off   If   an   error   with   the   radio   is   detected   a   buzzer   on   the   Base   Station   Controller   will   sound.   This   button   disables   or   enables   the   alarm   buzzer.   Hold   button   down   for   5   seconds   to   clear   any   radio   errors.   You   will   hear   two   long   beeps   as   errors   are   cleared.      

52.   52   |   Page     Step   1:   Insert   a   small   tool   into   one   of   the   square   holes   as   shown   in   the   figure   above.   This   will   release   the   spring   clamp   for   the   nearest   wire   to   allow   the   wire   to   be   inserted   or   removed.   Step   2:   Strip   the   insulation   off   the   end   of   the   wire   and   insert   it   into   the   round   hole   as   shown   in   the   figure   above.   Step   3:   Remove   the   tool.   The   spring   loaded   clamp   will   hold   the   wire   firmly   in   place.   6.12 FIRMWARE   UPDATE   When   newer   versions   of   the   Base   Station   Controller   firmware   become   available,   the   user   can   manually   update   the   unit   by   uploading   the   new   firmware.   The   update   file   name   must   have   the   following   name:   upgradebase.tar.gz    Figure   35  ‐  Firmware   Update   web   page     6.12.1 CURRENT   FIRMWARE   VERSION   6.12.1.1 VERSION   Displays   the   firmware   version   currently   loaded   in   the   Base   Station   Controller.   6.12.1.2 CURRENT   KERNEL   DATE   Displays   the   date   of   the   operating   system   kernel   the   Base   Station   Controller   is   running.  

40.   40   |   Page     6.7.1 STATIC   ROUTES   6.7.1.1 ROUTE   NAME   This   field   sets   the   alphanumeric   identifier   of   the   static   route   in   the   Routing   Table.   6.7.1.2 DESTINATION   IP   ADDRESS   This   field   sets   the   IP   address   of   the   destination   network.   6.7.1.3 IP   SUBNET   MASK   This   field   sets   the   subnet   mask   of   the   destination   network.   6.7.1.4 GATEWAY   IP   ADDRESS   This   field   sets   the   local   network   IP   address   for   the   gateway   to   the   destination   network.   Enter   the   address   of   the   local   gateway.   6.7.1.5 METRIC   Number   ranging   from   1   to   65,535.   The   lower   the   metric   value   the   higher   the   route   priority.   6.7.1.6 ADD   BUTTON   This   button   must   be   pressed   to   add   the   configured   route   to   the   table.   6.7.1.7 DELETE   ENTRY   When   clicked,   this   button   deletes   the   route   to   the   immediate   left   of   the   link.     6.8 SNMP   The   Simple   Network   Management   Protocol   (SNMP)   is   used   in   network   management   systems   to   monitor   network ‐ attached   devices   for   conditions   that   warrant   administrative   attention.   The   base   station   controller   supports   SNMP   version   v2c.        

32.   32   |   Page     6.0 BASE   STATION   WEB   MANAGEMENT   A   built ‐ in   web   server   makes   configuration   and   status   monitoring   possible   from   any   browser ‐ equipped   computer,   either   locally   or   remotely.   Status,   configuration,   and   online   help   are   available   without   requiring   special   client   software.   Setup   is   password   protected   to   avoid   tampering   or   unauthorized   changes.    Both   the   configuration   parameters   and   operating   firmware   can   be   updated   remotely,   even   over   the   RF   network   itself,   using   the   web   pages.   6.1 NAVIGATING   THE   NETWORK   MANAGEMENT   SYSTEM   The   web   interface   is   subdivided   in   two   frames:   the   left   frame   allows   the   user   to   navigate   the   main   menu,   while   the   right   main   frame   displays   the   selected   page.    Figure   23  ‐  Redundant   Base   Station   Homepage     6.2 MAIN   MENU    The   Base   Station’s   main   menu   grants   the   user   access   to   a   variety   of   web   pages   as   shown   in   Figure   23   above.   The   Reset   Unit   link   on   the   lower   left   of   the   screen   allows   the   user   to   reset   the   Base   Station   Controller.   As   the   Base   Station   Controller   resets,   it   will   power   cycle   all   of   the   radios   in   the   Base   Station.  

8.   8   |   Page     1.1.2 PHANTOM   II   REDUNDANT   BASE   STATION   BLOCK   DIAGRAM   242 ‐ 5399 ‐ 200   The   figure   below   shows   a   simplified   block   diagram   of   a   Redundant   Base   Station.   The   Phantom   II   Redundant   Base   Station   consists   of   a   Base   Station   Controller   board,   two   Phantom   IIs,   and   an   antenna   relay   all   contained   in   a   3U   19”   rack   mountable   chassis.   Only   one   Phantom   II   operates   at   a   time.   When   an   error   is   detected   with   the   primary   radio   the   Base   Station   Controller   will   automatically   switch   to   the   backup   radio.   Figure   2  ‐  Phantom   II   Redundant   Base   Station   Block   Diagram     1.2 PHYSICAL   DESCRIPTION   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   consists   of   a   Controller   board,   an   LED   display   board,   two   fans   and   shelving   to   house   various   radios.   The   unit   is   not   hermetically   sealed   and   should   be   mounted   in   a   suitable   enclosure   when   dust,   moisture,   and/or   a   corrosive   atmosphere   are   anticipated.    The   Base   Station   is   designed   for   easy   installation   and   configuration.   It   features   two   external   buttons.   However,   all   operating   parameters   may   be   set   by   connecting   to   the   Base   Station   via   Ethernet   and   using   a   web   browser.     

23.   23   |   Page     Enter   the   IP   addresses,   user   names,   and   passwords   of   the   Phantom   IIs   inside   the   Base   Station.   The   Base   Station   Controller   Board   uses   these   settings   to   talk   to   the   radios   and   receive   diagnostic   information.    When   the   information   is   entered   correctly   click   the   “ Next ”   button   at   the   bottom   of   the   web   page.   Figure   16  ‐  Redundant   Base   Station   Setup   Wizard   1   Enter   IP   Addresses     Step   3:   If   you   do   not   want   to   change   the   IP   address   of   the   Base   Station,   click   “ Next ”   now.   If   desired,   enter   in   a   new   IP   address   and   subnet   mask   for   the   Base   Station   Controller.   The   IP   address   of   the   Base   Station   Controller   must   be   different   than   the   Phantom   II’s   IP   address   but   must   be   on   the   same   IP   subnet   as   the   radios   inside   the   Base   Station.   When   the   IP   address   is   entered   correctly   click   the   “ Next ”   button   at   the   bottom   of   the   web   page.   The   IP   address   of   the   Base   Station   Controller   will   update   immediately.   A   new   browser   window   will   open   taking   you   to   the   third   setup   wizard   page.   You   will   need   to   re ‐ enter   the   login   credentials.    Figure   17  ‐  Redundant   Base   Station   Setup   Wizard   2    

39.   39   |   Page     6.6.1.4 ALARM   PORT   SUPPLY   VOLTAGE   This   field   displays   the   supply   voltage   to   the   Alarm   Port   logic   circuits.   The   supply   voltage   is   user   selectable   and   can   be   set   to   either   1.8V   or   3.3V.   Click   on   Alarm   Port   on   the   main   menu   to   access   the   Alarm   Port   settings.   6.6.1.5 FORWARD   TX   POWER   This   field   displays   the   forward   transmit   power   of   the   radio   in   use.    This   value   is   read   from   the   Phantom   II   radio.   6.6.1.6 FAN   STATUS   This   field   displays   the   status   of   the   two   12VDC   fans   located   in   the   Base   Station.   6.6.1.7 FAN   VOLTAGE   This   field   displays   the   supply   voltage   to   the   two   12V   DC   fans.   If   the   input   voltage   to   the   Base   Station   drops   to   13V   or   lower,   the   fan   voltage   will   slump   below   12V.   This   is   normal   due   to   the   voltage   drop   through   the   buck   switching   power   supply   on   the   Controller   Board.   The   fans   may   spin   slower   but   they   will   not   be   harmed   by   the   lower   voltage.   6.7 ROUTING   TABLE   Static   routes   may   be   created   from   the   Routing   Table   webpage.   The   static   routes   will   appear   in   the   table   at   the   bottom   of   the   screen.   Static   Routing   refers   to   a   manual   method   used   to   set   up   routing   between   networks.   Figure   27  ‐  Routing   Table   Web   Page    

24.   24   |   Page     Step   4:   The   Controller   Board   can   be   programmed   to   periodically   send   out   a   ping   to   a   remote   site   to   verify   the   RF   link   is   still   working.    To   enable   the   ping   utility,   enter   a   Primary   Ping   IP   Address   and,   if   desired,   a   Secondary   Ping   IP   Address.   These   IP   addresses   should   be   remote   radios   that   are   located   one   hop   from   the   Base   Station.      Next,   set   the   Ping   Timer   as   desired.    When   the   Ping   Timer   expires   the   Base   Station   Controller   will   attempt   to   ping   either   the   Primary   or   Secondary   IP   Address.   If   the   ping   is   unsuccessful,   the   base   station   will   switch   to   the   back ‐ up   radio.     To   disable   the   ping,   set   the   Ping   Timer   to   0.   When   satisfied   with   the   changes,   click   “ Next ”.   Figure   18  ‐  Redundant   Base   Station   Setup   Wizard   3     Step   5:   If   the   Phantom   IIs   are   setup   in   Bridge   Mode,   click   “ Next ”.   If   the   Phantom   IIs   are   setup   in   Router   mode   and   the   Ping   Timer   is   enabled,   you   must   program   in   static   IP   routes   in   order   for   the   Base   Station   Ping   Utility   to   work   correctly.   Program   in   static   routes   for   the   Primary   and   Secondary   IP   Ping   Addresses   entered   on   the   previous   page.   When   all   of   the   routes   have   been   entered,   click   “ Next ”.        

58.   58   |   Page     6.15.1.5 BOOT   DELAY   The   Base   Station   Controller   will   wait   the   specified   number   of   minutes   after   booting   up   a   radio   before   attempting   to   ping.   This   parameter   is   useful   to   delay   normal   pingins,   if   additional   time   is   required   to   allow   the   RF   network   to   stabilize.   6.15.2 CONTROLLER   OPERATION    6.15.2.1 MODE   The   user   can   set   the   operational   mode   of   the   Base   Station.   Select   "Auto"   to   allow   the   Base   Station   to   automatically   detect   radio   failures   and   switch   to   the   back ‐ up   radio   in   the   event   of   a   failure.   Select   "Manual   Override"   to   override   the   Base   Station's   error   detection   algorithm   and   force   the   use   of   either   Radio   A   or   Radio   B.    6.15.2.2 PRIMARY   RADIO    In   Auto   mode,   this   setting   selects   which   radio   is   the   primary   radio   and   which   is   the   backup   radio.   In   Manual   Override   mode,   this   setting   selects   which   radio   is   currently   in   use.    6.16 PING   STATISTICS   This   web   page   is   only   available   with   Redundant   versions   of   the   Base   Station.   The   link   will   not   appear   in   the   Standard   versions   of   the   Base   Station.   The   Ping   Statistics   page   show   how   often   and   with   what   success   rate   the   Base   Station   Controller   has   been   at   pinging   the   primary   and   secondary   IP   addresses   specified   on   the   Redundant   Setup   web   page.   Figure   39  ‐  Ping   Statistics   web   page  

5. 6.5.5   Periodic   Reset   Timer   ............................................................................................................................... ......................   38   6.6   Controller   Diagnostics   ............................................................................................................................... ............................   38   6.7   Routing   Table   ............................................................................................................................... .........................................   39   6.7.1   Static   Routes   ............................................................................................................................... ..................................   40   6.8   SNMP   ............................................................................................................................... ......................................................   40   6.8.1   SNMP   Configuration   ............................................................................................................................... ......................   42   6.8.2   SNMP   Traps   Configuration   ............................................................................................................................... ............   42   6.8.3   SNMP   Trap   Sink   ............................................................................................................................... .............................   43   6.9   QoS   ............................................................................................................................... .........................................................   44   6.9.1   QoS   Basic   Configuration   ............................................................................................................................... ................   45   6.9.2   QoS   Queue   Configuration   ............................................................................................................................... ..............   45   6.9.3   Filter   ............................................................................................................................... ..............................................   45   6.9.4   Filter   Table   ............................................................................................................................... .....................................   46   6.10   QoS   Statistics   ............................................................................................................................... ..........................................   47   6.10.1   Overview   ............................................................................................................................... .......................................   47   6.10.2   Statistics   ............................................................................................................................... ........................................   47   6.11   Alarm   Port   ............................................................................................................................... ..............................................   47   6.11.1   Overview   ............................................................................................................................... .......................................   48   6.11.2   Configuring   the   Alarm   Port   ............................................................................................................................... ............   49   6.11.3   Relay   Settings   ............................................................................................................................... ................................   50   6.11.4   Input/Output   Settings   ............................................................................................................................... ...................   50   6.11.5   Digital   Inputs   ............................................................................................................................... .................................   51   6.11.6   Analog   Inputs   ............................................................................................................................... .................................   51   6.11.7   Connecting   Wire   to   the   Spring   Loaded   Connector   .......................................................................................................   51   6.12   Firmware   Update   ............................................................................................................................... ...................................   52   6.12.1   Current   Firmware   Version   ............................................................................................................................... .............   52   6.12.2   Upload   New   Firmware   ............................................................................................................................... ...................   53   6.12.3   Configuration   File   ............................................................................................................................... ..........................   53   6.13   Radio   Settings   ............................................................................................................................... .........................................   54   6.13.1   Radio   Configuration   ............................................................................................................................... .......................   54   6.14   Radio   Diagnostics   ............................................................................................................................... ...................................   55   6.14.1   Radio   Status   ............................................................................................................................... ...................................   55   6.14.2   Radio   Diagnostics   ............................................................................................................................... ..........................   56   6.15   Redundant   Setup   ............................................................................................................................... ....................................   56   6.15.1   Ping   Settings   ............................................................................................................................... ..................................   57   6.15.2   Controller   Operation   ............................................................................................................................... .....................   58   6.16   Ping   Statistics   ............................................................................................................................... .........................................   58   6.16.1   Primary/Secondary   Address   Pings   ............................................................................................................................... .   59   APPENDIX   A:   BASE   STATION   SPECIFICATIONS   ............................................................................................................................... .   60   APPENDIX   B:   PRODUCT   WARRANTY   ............................................................................................................................... ...............   62   APPENDIX   C:   DEFINITIONS   ............................................................................................................................... ..............................   63    

14.   14   |   Page     1.3 PART   NUMBERS   AND   AVAILABILITY   1.3.1 BASE   STATION   Table   4   lists   the   orderable   part   numbers   and   frequency   ranges   of   the   Phantom   II   Base   Station.   The   radios   that   are   installed   inside   the   19”   Rack   Mount   Chassis   are   included   with   the   Phantom   II   Base   Station   and   do   not   need   to   be   ordered   separately.   Table   4  ‐  Orderable   Part   Number   Breakdown   DESCRIPTION   BASE   STATION   PART   NUMBER   FREQUENCY RADIO   PART   NUMBER Standard   Base   Station   242 ‐ 5199 ‐ 200 902 – 928 MHz Phantom   II   260 ‐ 5099 ‐ 200 Redundant   Base   Station   242 ‐ 5399 ‐ 200 902 – 928 MHz Two   Phantom   II 260 ‐ 5099 ‐ 200 1.3.2 ACCESSORIES   AND   OPTIONS   Table   5   and   Table   6   list   standard   accessories   (including   antenna,   feedline,   and   connectors)   that   have   been   tested   and   approved   for   use   with   the   Base   Station.   Table   5  ‐  Antenna   Kits   ITEM   PART   NUMBER 890 ‐ 960   MHz,   6.4   dBd   Antenna   Kit   250 ‐ 5099 ‐ 011   890 ‐ 960   MHz,   10   dBd   Antenna   Kit   250 ‐ 5099 ‐ 021     Antenna   kits   include   a   premium   antenna,   antenna   mounting   bracket,   surge   protector,   grounding   kit,   cable   ties,   and   weather   kit.   UHF/900   kits   include   25   feet   of   LMR400   antenna   feedline.   Feedline   is   available   for   VHF   kits   in   25   or   50   feet   lengths   (see   below).   Table   6  ‐  Feedline   and   Connectors         ITEM   PART   NUMBER 25   feet   antenna   feedline   (LMR400),   N ‐ Male   250 ‐ 0200 ‐ 025   50   feet   antenna   feedline   (LMR400),   N ‐ Male   250 ‐ 0200 ‐ 055   Barrel   Connector,   RF1   N   type,   Female   250 ‐ 0200 ‐ 100  

10.   10   |   Page     The   LED   panel   has   up   to   seventeen   Tri ‐ Color   LEDs.   The   functionality   of   each   LED   is   described   in   Section   5.2.   1.2.2 ETHERNET   LAN   PORTS   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   has   two   external   Ethernet   LAN   Ports.   The   two   external   Ethernet   Ports   are   connected   to   each   other   and   to   the   radios   inside   the   Base   Station   with   an   embedded   Ethernet   Switch.   The   Ethernet   LAN   ports   consist   of   an   RJ ‐ 45   receptacle   with   a   10/100   BaseT   Ethernet   connection   and   Auto ‐ MDIX   feature.   Table   1   shows   pin ‐ out   descriptions   for   the   RJ ‐ 45   port.   Table   1  ‐  Pin ‐ out   for   IEEE ‐ 802.3   RJ ‐ 45   Receptacle   Contacts   Contact   10/100 Base ‐ T   Signal 1   TXP (1)   2   TXN (1)   3   RXP (1)   4   SPARE    5   SPARE    6   RXN (1)   7   SPARE    8   SPARE    SHELL   Shield   (1)   The   name   shows   the   default   function.   Given   the   Auto ‐ MDIX   capability   of   the   Ethernet   transceiver,   TX   and   RX   function   could   be   swapped.                           1.2.3 DIAGNOSTIC   AND   DATA   PORTS   The   Diagnostic   and   Data   serial   connections   are   RS ‐ 232   compliant.   Serial   port   considerations:       Base   Station   Diagnostic   and   Data   ports   are   Data   Communication   Equipment   (DCE)   devices    In   general,   equipment   connected   to   the   Base   Station’s   Diagnostic/Data   serial   port   is   Data   Terminal   Equipment   (DTE)   and   a   straight ‐ through   cable   is   recommended.    Note:   If   a   DCE   device   is   connected   to   the   Base   Station’s   Diagnostic/Data   port,   a   null   modem   cable/adapter   is   required.  

13.   13   |   Page     Table   3  ‐  Pin ‐ out   of   the   power   connector   Contact   #   (Left   to   Right) Color Description 4   Not   Connected Auxiliary   Power   A   3   Black Ground 2   Red Positive   (11 ‐ 30)   VDC   1   Not   Connected Auxiliary   Power   B   1.2.7 ANTENNA   CONNECTOR   The   Standard   and   Redundant   Base   Stations   have   a   single   50 ‐ ohm   N   female   antenna   connector.   This   connection   functions   for   both   transmit   and   receive.   In   the   Redundant   Base   Station,   an   internal   RF   relay   will   automatically   switch   the   antenna   connection   to   whichever   radio   is   currently   in   use.   To   reduce   potential   interference,   the   antenna   type   and   its   gain   should   be   chosen   to   ensure   the   effective   isotropic   radiated   power   (EIRP)   is   not   more   than   required   for   successful   communication.   1.2.8 RESET   BUTTON   Directly   above   the   Base   Station’s   power   connector   is   a   small   hole   that   allows   access   to   the   reset   button.   Place   a   paper   clip   or   other   narrow   object   into   the   hole   to   press   and   hold   the   reset   button   for   five   seconds.   After   5   seconds,   a   short   chirp   will   be   heard   and   the   settings   of   the   Base   Station   will   be   set   back   to   the   factory   defaults.   After   the   settings   are   reset,   the   Base   Station   will   automatically   reboot.   Note:   This   operation   will   set   the   IP   address   of   the   Phantom   II   Base   Station   back   to   its   default   value   of   192.168.1.1.   1.2.9 CHASSIS   DIMENSIONS   Figure   7   shows   the   physical   dimensions   of   the   Base   Station.   Figure   7  ‐  Base   Station   Dimensions   (units   are   in   inches)    

22.   22   |   Page     Step   5:   Setup   is   now   complete,   click   “ Finish ”.   Figure   14  ‐  Standard   Base   Station   Setup   Wizard   3     3.3 CONFIGURE   A   PHANTOM   II   REDUNDANT   BASE   STATION   Base   Station   units   must   be   programmed   using   the   web   interface.   The   following   instructions   described   how   to   configure   the   Redundant   Base   Station .   Step   1:   Login   to   the   Base   Station   Controller   Board’s   web   pages   using   the   default   IP   address   192.168.1.1,   username:   “ admin ”   password:   “ admin ”.    Step   2:   Select   “Setup   Wizard”   from   the   menu   on   the   left   hand   side   of   the   web   page.   Press   the   “Select   Radio   A”   button.   Program   the   first   Phantom   II   by   opening   a   new   web   browser   window   and   logging   into   the   Phantom   II’s   web   page   using   the   default   IP   address   192.168.1.254,   username:   “ admin ”   password:   “ admin ”.   Setup   the   Phantom   II   using   its   web   pages.   See   the   Phantom   II   user   manual   for   additional   information.    When   configuration   is   complete,   press   the   “Select   Radio   B”   button,   on   the   Base   Station   Controller’s   web   page,   to   configure   the   next   radio.   Program   the   second   Phantom   II   by   logging   into   its   web   pages   using   the   default   IP   address   192.168.1.254,   username:   “ admin ”   password:   “ admin ”.   Program   the   second   Phantom   II   radio   identical   to   the   first   radio.   Important:   The   second   Phantom   II   must   be   programmed   with   the   same   IP   Address   as   the   first   Phantom   II.   Figure   15  ‐  Redundant   Base   Station   Setup   Wizard   1   Select   Radios     

56.   56   |   Page     6.14.1.2 RADIO   STATUS   (A   AND   B):    These   fields   display   the   status   of   Radio   A   and   B.   If   an   error   is   detected   with   either   radio   it   will   be   reported   on   these   lines.    6.14.1.3 RADIO   FAILURES   DETECTED   Displays   the   number   of   times   a   failure   was   detected   with   the   radios.    6.14.2 RADIO   DIAGNOSTICS   The   statistics   reported   in   this   section   are   measured   and   reported   by   the   individual   radio(s).   6.14.2.1 MAC   ADDRESS    This   field   displays   the   MAC   Address   of   the   radio(s).   6.14.2.2 WIRELESS   MAC   ADDRESS    This   field   displays   the   wireless   MAC   Address   of   the   radio(s).   6.14.2.3 INPUT   VOLTAGE   This   field   displays   the   voltage   level   supplied   to   the   radios   from   the   Base   Station   Controller.   6.14.2.4 TEMPERATURE   This   field   displays   the   current   temperature   being   read   from   within   the   radio.   6.14.2.5 TX   FORWARD   POWER   This   field   displays   the   transmitter   power   level   as   programmed   by   the   user.   6.14.2.6 REFRESH   The   button   will   update   the   web   page   to   reflect   the   most   recent   changes.   6.15 REDUNDANT   SETUP   This   web   page   is   only   available   with   Redundant   versions   of   the   Base   Station.   The   link   will   not   appear   in   the   Standard   versions   of   the   Base   Station.   The   Redundant   Setup   web   page   allows   the   user   to   program   a   remote   IP   address   that   the   Base   Station   Controller   will   ping   to   determine   if   the   RF   link   is   working.   This   page   also   allows   the   user   to   select   Auto   or   Manual   Override   mode   and   switch   between   radios   A   and   B.  

18.   18   |   Page     3.0 BASE   STATION   QUICK   START   3.1 CONNECTING   TO   THE   PHANTOM   II   BASE   STATION   AND   RADIOS   3.1.1 SETUP   AND   CONFIGURATION   It   is   easy   to   set   up   a   Base   Station   network   to   verify   basic   unit   operation   and   experiment   with   network   designs   and   configurations.    It   is   important   to   use   a   network   IP   address   different   from   others   currently   in   use   in   your   test   area.   This   will   eliminate   unnecessary   disruption   of   traffic   on   the   existing   network   while   you   become   familiar   with   the   Base   Station.    3.1.2 INSTALL   THE   ANTENNA   An   RX/TX   antenna   is   required   for   basic   operation.   For   demo   units   only,   connect   the   antenna   as   shown   in   Figure   10   to   provide   stable   radio   communications   between   demo   devices.    Figure   10  ‐  Demo   Antenna   Assembly   Note:   It   is   important   to   use   attenuation   between   all   demo   units   in   the   test   network   to   reduce   the   amount   of   signal   strength   in   the   test   environment.    3.1.3 CONNECT   PRIMARY   POWER   Primary   power   for   the   Phantom   II   Base   Station   must   be   within   11 ‐ 30   VDC   and   be   capable   of   providing   a   minimum   of   30   watt   supply   for   Tx   @   1W.   A   power   connector   with   60”   of   wire   is   provided   with   each   unit.   Observe   proper   polarity   when   connecting   the   cables   to   the   power   supply.    3.1.4 CONNECT   BASE   STATION   TO   PROGRAMMING   PC   Connect   a   PC’s   Ethernet   port   to   the   LAN   port   using   a   CAT   5   Ethernet   cable.   The   LINK/ACT   LED   in   the   DATA   box   should   light   on   the   front   panel   of   the   Base   Station.       

53.   53   |   Page     6.12.2 UPLOAD   NEW   FIRMWARE   6.12.2.1 FILE   This   field   specifies   the   path   for   the   new   firmware   file   to   be   uploaded   to   the   Base   Station   Controller.   The   Browse   button   can   be   used   to   locate   the   file   on   your   computer.   The   update   file   name   must   be   the   following:   upgradebase.tar.gz   6.12.2.2 PROGRESS   The   field   displays   the   update   progress   after   the   "Upload   Firmware   to   Base   Station"   button   has   been   pressed.   6.12.3 CONFIGURATION   FILE   6.12.3.1 UPLOAD   CONFIG   FILE   In   this   field,   enter   the   configuration   file   to   be   uploaded   to   the   Base   Station   Controller.   The   Browse   button   can   be   used   to   locate   the   file   on   your   computer.   The   file   to   be   uploaded   must   be   named   config.xml .   Select   the   Upload   Config   File   radio   button.   Then,   click   Proceed   to   upload   a   new   configuration   file.   6.12.3.2 DOWNLOAD   CONFIG   FILE   Select   the   Download   Config   File   radio   button.   Then,   click   Proceed   to   return   a   link   to   the   configuration   file   on   the   Base   Station.   Right ‐ click   the   link   and   select   "Save   Target   As..."   to   save   the   file.   The   link   page   refreshes   after   15   seconds.   It   is   recommended   to   use   the   default   filename   to   save   the   file.   If   multiple   files   need   to   be   maintained,   it   is   recommended   to   use   directory   paths   to   separate   the   files.   6.12.3.3 RESTORE   FACTORY   DEFAULTS   Select   the   Restore   Factory   Defaults   radio   button.   Then,   click   Proceed   to   set   the   Base   Station   settings   back   to   their   original   factory   defaults.   The   IP   address   of   the   Controller   Board   will   be   set   back   to   192.168.1.1.      

57.   57   |   Page     Figure   38  ‐  Redundant   Setup   web   page      6.15.1 PING   SETTINGS    6.15.1.1 PRIMARY   PING   IP   ADDRESS   Enter   the   IP   address   of   a   remote   radio.   The   Base   Station   will   generate   a   ping   request   to   the   IP   address   specified   after   X   number   of   seconds   as   specified   by   the   Ping   Timer.   The   primary   and   secondary   IP   ping   address   should   be   remote   radios   that   are   located   one   RF   hop   from   the   Base   Station.   Note:   If   the   primary   and   secondary   IP   addresses   are   on   separate   subnets   from   the   Base   Station   Controller,   static   routes   must   be   programmed   into   the   Routing   Table   of   the   Base   Station   Controller.   If   the   routes   are   not   programmed   in,   the   Base   Station   Controller   will   be   unable   to   ping   the   remote   addresses   and   the   pings   will   fail.   6.15.1.2 SECONDARY   PING   IP   ADDRESS   If   pings   to   the   Primary   IP   address   fail,   the   Base   Station   will   attempt   to   ping   the   secondary   IP   address.   The   secondary   ping   IP   address   is   not   required   for   the   ping   utility   to   function   and   may   be   left   blank,   if   desired.   6.15.1.3 PING   TIMER   This   field   specifies   a   ping   interval   in   increments   of   5   seconds.   The   Base   Station   will   ping   the   primary   or   secondary   IP   addresses   after   the   specified   period.   Enter   0   to   disable   the   automatic   ping   feature.    6.15.1.4 PING   FAILURE   THRESHOLD    The   Base   Station   will   switch   to   the   back ‐ up   radio   if   both   the   primary   and   the   secondary   (if   available)   pings   fail   this   number   of   times.   The   failure   counter   is   reset   each   time   a   ping   is   successful.   

31.   31   |   Page     5.2 LED   FUNCTIONS   The   LED   panel   has   seventeen   Tri ‐ Color   LEDs.   The   functionality   of   each   LED   is   shown   in   Table   9.     Table   9  ‐  Base   Station   LED   Functionality    LED   Color Definition Power   Green   Off   Base   Station   ready,   normal   operations Base   Station   hardware   fault   or   power   is   not   applied   Status   Green   Red   Base   Station   has   no   faults,   normal   operations   Base   Station   has   a   fault   condition,   check   unit   status   Fan   Error     Red   Off   Indicates   a   problem   with   the   fans Fans   are   operational   COM/SETUP   Data   Blinking   Red   Blinking   Green   Data   is   transmitting   on   one   of   the   Ports Data   is   being   received   on   one   of   the   Ports   LINK/ACT   1/2   Solid   Red   Flashing   Red   Solid   Green   Flashing   Green   Link   at   10Mbit/s Activity   at   10Mbit/s   Link   at   100Mbit/s   Activity   at   100Mbit/s   Radio   A/B   Tx   Always   Off   In   the   Phantom   II   base   station   this   LED   is   not   connected.    It   will   always   be   off,   even   if   the   radio   is   transmitting   successfully.   Radio   A/B   In   Use   Green   Radio   is   in   use Radio   A/B   Error   Off   Red   Flashing   Red   No   errors   have   been   detected   with   the   radio(s)   An   error   has   been   detected   with   the   radio(s)   The   maximum   number   of   failures   has   been   reached.   The   Controller   will   no   longer   attempt   to   switch   radios.   Radio   A/B   Link/Act   Solid   Red   Flashing   Red   Solid   Green   Flashing   Green   Link   at   10Mbit/s Activity   at   10Mbit/s   Link   at   100Mbit/s   Activity   at   100Mbit/s   Manual   Override   (redundant   version)   Red   Off   Radio   selection   is   done   manually Radio   selection   is   done   automatically   by   the   Base   Station   Controller   Alarm   Disabled   Red   Off   The   onboard   buzzer   alarm   is   currently   disabled   The   buzzer   is   enabled        

47.   47   |   Page     6.10 QOS   STATISTICS   Figure   30   –   QoS   Statistics   Web   Page     6.10.1 OVERVIEW   The   QoS   Statistics   page   gives   information   on   how   the   current   QoS   is   performing,   so   that   in   can   be   adjusted   with   greater   precision.   The   Refresh   button   will   update   the   QoS   Statistics   page   to   the   most   current   statistics.   The   Clear   button   will   reset   the   statistics;   changing   any   QoS   setting   will   also   reset   the   statistics.   6.10.2 STATISTICS   Rate:   The   rate   of   traffic   flowing   through   the   queue.   The   rate   is   calculated   using   a   time   weighted   average   over   the   past   several   minutes.    The   Clear   button   does   not   reset   the   rate.   Packets   Sent:   The   number   of   packets   that   have   passed   through   the   queue   since   the   last   clear   or   setting   change.    Packets   Backlogged:   The   number   of   packets   currently   queued   up   and   waiting   for   transmission.   The   Clear   button   will   not   reset   this.   Packets   Dropped:   The   number   of   packets   dropped,   due   to   exceeding   the   buffer   size   for   the   queue,   since   the   last   clear   or   setting   change.     Bytes   Sent:   The   number   of   bytes   that   have   passed   through   the   queue.     Bytes   Backlogged:   The   number   of   bytes   currently   queued   up   and   waiting   for   transmission.   The   Clear   button   will   not   reset   this.   6.11 ALARM   PORT   This   section   describes   the   function   of   the   ALARM   port.   The   Alarm   port   is   connected   to   two   relays,   the   Alarm   Relay   (Relay   1)   and   the   Radio   In   Use   Relay   (Relay   2).   Either   of   these   two   relays   may   be   controlled   automatically   by   the   Base   Station   (Redundant   Base   Station   only)   or   may   be   switched   manually   by   the   user   using   the   Base   Station’s   web   page   interface.   

34.   34   |   Page     6.3.2 SYSTEM   INFORMATION   6.3.2.1 BASE   STATION   TYPE   This   field   displays   the   type   of   Base   Station   configuration.   This   setting   is   programmed   at   the   factory.   Possible   values   include:   Standard   Base   Station   or   Redundant   Base   Station.   6.3.2.2 BASE   STATION   MODEL   This   field   displays   the   current   part   number   /   model   number   of   the   Base   Station   being   used.   6.3.2.3 SYSTEM   UP   TIME   This   timer   is   listed   in   seconds   and   shows   the   time   since   the   last   reboot.   1   minute   =   60   seconds   of   up   time,   1   hour   =   3600   seconds,   1   day   =   86400   seconds,   1   year   =   31,536,000   seconds   6.3.2.4 CURRENT   FIRMWARE   VERSION   This   field   displays   the   current   firmware   version   loaded   in   the   Base   Station   Controller.    6.3.2.5 CURRENT   KERNEL   DATE   This   field   displays   the   date   of   the   operating   system   kernel   the   Base   Station   Controller   is   running.   6.3.3 RADIO   INFORMATION   This   field   displays   the   model   number   of   the   radio(s)   installed   in   the   Base   Station.   "N/A"   will   be   listed   when   a   radio   is   not   installed   in   the   slot.   For   example,   a   Standard   Base   Station   will   only   have   one   radio   installed,   while   a   Redundant   Base   Station   will   have   radios   installed   in   both   slots.   6.3.3.1 RADIO   A/B   MODEL   This   field   displays   the   model   number   and   type   of   radio(s)   installed   in   the   Base   Station.   6.3.3.2 REFRESH   STATUS   This   button   refreshes   the   current   page.   6.4 SETUP   WIZARD   The   Setup   Wizard   will   guide   the   user   through   the   steps   required   to   configure   the   Base   Station.   The   Setup   Wizard   consists   of   3   web   pages   for   the   Standard   Base   Station.   The   Setup   Wizard   for   the   Redundant   Base   Station   consists   of   5   web   pages.   

11.   11   |   Page     In   a   Standard   Base   Station   with   one   radio,   the   external   serial   ports   are   always   connected   to   the   Diagnostic   and   Data   ports   of   the   radio   inside   the   Base   Station.   In   a   two   radio   Redundant   Base   Station,   the   two   serial   ports   are   connected   to   whichever   radio   is   currently   in   use.   When   the   active   radio   changes,   an   internal   multiplexer   will   switch   both   serial   port   connections   to   the   second   radio.   The   pin   outs   for   the   serial   connections   can   be   found   in   the   radio’s   user   manual.   1.2.4 ALARM   PORT   The   Alarm   Port   is   an   8   pin   header   that   has   two   relays   and   a   general   purpose   input/output   pin.   In   the   Redundant   Base   Station,   one   relay   can   be   configured   to   indicate   if   an   error   has   been   detected   with   either   radio   and   the   other   relay   can   be   configured   to   indicate   which   radio   is   currently   being   used.   For   a   full   description   of   this   port   see   Section   6.8   in   this   user   manual.   1.2.5 RADIO   I/O   PORT   The   Radio   I/O   port   is   an   8   pin   header   that   provides   access   to   the   Base   Station’s   radio’s   digital   or   analog   I/O   lines.   These   8   lines   are   routed   to   whichever   radio   is   currently   in   use   (Radio   A   or   Radio   B).   In   the   Phantom   II   Base   Station,   4   of   the   8   lines   connected   to   the   Phantom   II’s   RS485/422   communication   lines.   The   pin   out   is   shown   in   the   table   below:   Table   2  ‐  Pin ‐ out   for   Radio   I/O   Port   (RS485/RS422)   Contact   RS485/422   Signal Input   or   Output   1   RxA   (R ‐ )   I   2   TxA   (D ‐ )   O   3   RxB   (R+)   I   4   TxB   (D+)   O   5   Unused   (NC)    6   Unused   (NC)    7   Unused   (NC)    8   Unused   (NC)           

61.   61   |   Page      Power    Aux   Power   B   Alarm   –   I/O;   Radio   –   I/O   Header Plug   8   Pin,   3.5mm,   Header 8   Pin   3.5mm   Tension   Clamp   Conductor   Size:   18 ‐ 28   AWG   Internal   Auxiliary   Power   Header Plug   4   Pin,   3.5mm,   Power   Header 4   Pin,   3.5mm,   Power   Plug Connections:    Aux   Power   B    Power    Ground    Aux   Power   A   Alarm   I/O   Port   Specifications   Relays     Max   Switching   Current:   Relay   1   or   2 (Pins   1,   2,   3,   4,   5,   6)   1   A     Max   Voltage   on   Relay   1 (Pins   2,   4,   6)   +/ ‐ 110   V   (DC)   +/ ‐ 125   V   (AC)     Max   Voltage   on   Relay   2 (Pins   1,   3,   5)   +/ ‐ 50   V     Max   Switching   Power 30   W   (DC);   37.5   VA   (AC)     Digital   Inputs   and   Outputs   VIH:   High   Level   Input   Voltage (Pins:   1,   5,   7)   I/O   Supply   Voltage   =   1.8V   I/O   Supply   Voltage   =   3.3V     1.2   V   min   2.0   V   min     VIL:   Low   Level   Input   Voltage (Pins:   1,   5,   7)   I/O   Supply   Voltage=   1.8V   I/O   Supply   Voltage   =   3.3V     0.6   V   max   0.8   V   max     Digital   Inputs:   Input   Impedance (Pins   1,   5)   150k   ohms     Digital   I/O:   Input/Output   Impedance   (Pin   7)   100   ohms     Min/Max   Input   Voltage Pins   1,   5   Pin   7   (I/O   Supply   =   1.8V)   Pin   7   (I/O   Supply   =   3.3V)   +/ ‐ 50   V   max   ‐ 1.0   V   min,   +2.8   V   max   ‐ 1.0   V   min,   +4.3   V   max     Output   Voltage:   Pin   7 Output   High:   (I/O   Supply   =   1.8V,   Isource   =   1mA)   (I/O   Supply   =   3.3V,   Isource   =   1mA)   Output   Low:   (I/O   Supply   =   1.8V,   Isink   =   1mA)   (I/O   Supply   =   3.3V,   Isink   =   1mA)       1.7V   (typical)   3.2V   (typical)   0.1V   (typical)   0.1V   (typical)     Analog   Input   Analog   Input   (Pin   7)   Range I/O   Supply   =   1.8V   I/O   Supply   =   3.3V   0.0   V   to   1.8   V   0.0   V   to   3.3   V     Analog   Input   Accuracy +/ ‐ 0.1   V

20.   20   |   Page     3.1.6 NETWORK   LOGIN   Base   Station:   On   your   Internet   browser   address   line,   type   the   Phantom   II   Base   Station   factory ‐ default   IP   address:   192.168.1.1.   Press   Enter   to   open   the   Network   Password   screen.   Phantom   II   Radio:   With   a   separate   Internet   browser   window,   type   the   Phantom   II   factory ‐ default   IP   address:   192.168.1.254.   Press   Enter   to   open   the   Network   Password   screen.   3.1.7 INITIAL   INSTALLATION   LOGIN   Base   Station:   For   an   initial   installation,   enter   a   User   Name   “ admin ”   and   the   default   password   “ admin ”.   Click   OK.   The   web   interface   screen   opens.    Phantom   II   Radio:   For   an   initial   installation,   enter   a   User   Name   “ admin ”   and   the   default   password   “ admin ”.   Click   OK.   The   web   interface   screen   opens.    3.2 CONFIGURE   A   PHANTOM   II   STANDARD   BASE   STATION    Base   Station   units   must   be   programmed   using   the   web   interface.   The   following   instructions   describe   how   to   configure   the   Standard   Base   Station .   Step   1:   Program   the   Phantom   II   by   logging   into   the   Phantom   II’s   web   pages   using   the   default   IP   address   192.168.1.254,   username:   “ admin ”   password:   “ admin ”.   Setup   the   Phantom   II   using   the   Phantom   II’s   web   pages.   See   the   Phantom   II   user   manual   for   additional   information.   Step   2:   Login   to   Phantom   II   Base   Station   Controller   Board’s   web   pages   by   logging   into   the   default   IP   address   192.168.1.1,   username:   “ admin ”   password:   “ admin ”.   Step   3:   Select   “Setup   Wizard”   from   the   menu   on   the   left   hand   side   of   the   web   page.   Enter   the   IP   addresses,   user   names,   and   passwords   of   the   Phantom   II   inside   the   Base   Station.   The   Base   Station   Controller   Board   uses   these   settings   to   talk   to   the   radio   and   receive   diagnostic   information.   When   the   information   is   entered   correctly   click   the   “ Next ”   button   at   the   bottom   of   the   web   page.                  

15.   15   |   Page     1.4 PRODUCT   WARRANTY   It   is   our   guarantee   that   every   Phantom   II   Base   Station   will   be   free   from   physical   defects   in   material   and   workmanship   for   one   year   from   the   date   of   purchase   when   used   within   the   limits   set   forth   in   Appendix   A:   Specifications.    The   manufacturer's   warranty   statement   is   available   in   Appendix   B.   If   the   product   proves   defective   during   the   warranty   period,   contact   our   Customer   Service   Department   to   obtain   a   Return   Material   Authorization   (RMA).   BE   SURE   TO   HAVE   THE   EQUIPMENT   MODEL,   SERIAL   NUMBER,   AND   BILLING   &   SHIPPING   ADDRESSES   AVAILABLE   WHEN   CALLING.   You   may   also   request   an   RMA   online   at   www.calamp.com.   FACTORY   AND   TECHNICAL   SUPPORT   M ‐ F   7:30 ‐ 4:30   CST   CalAmp   299   Johnson   Ave.,   Ste   110,   Waseca,   MN   56093   Tel   507.833.8819;   Fax   507.833.6758    Email   imcsupport@calamp.com   1.5 RMA   REQUEST   When   returning   a   product,   mark   the   RMA   number   clearly   on   the   outside   of   the   package.   Include   a   complete   description   of   the   problem   and   the   name   and   telephone   number   of   a   contact   person.   RETURN   REQUESTS   WILL   NOT   BE   PROCESSED   WITHOUT   THIS   INFORMATION.   Contact   Customer   Service:   CalAmp   299   Johnson   Ave.,   Ste   110   Waseca,   MN   56093   Tel   1.507.833.8819    BE   SURE   TO   HAVE   THE   EQUIPMENT   MODEL   AND   SERIAL   NUMBER,   AND   BILLING   AND   SHIPPING   ADDRESSES   ON   HAND   WHEN   CALLING.     For   units   in   warranty,   customers   are   responsible   for   shipping   charges   to   CalAmp.   For   units   returned   out   of   warranty,   customers   are   responsible   for   all   shipping   charges.   Return   shipping   instructions   are   the   responsibility   of   the   customer.   1.6 DOCUMENTATION   AND   DOWNLOADS   CalAmp   reserves   the   right   to   update   its   products,   software,   or   documentation   without   obligation   to   notify   any   individual   or   entity.   Product   updates   may   result   in   differences   between   the   information   provided   in   this   manual   and   the   product   shipped.   For   access   to   the   most   current   product   documentation   and   application   notes,   visit   www.calamp.com.       

51.   51   |   Page     6.11.4.3 PIN   7   OUTPUT    When   the   Pin   7   function   is   set   to   "Digital   Output",   the   user   can   set   the   output   voltage   level   of   Pin   7   as   High   or   Low.   The   digital   output   is   connected   to   the   Alarm   Port   through   a   100   ohm   resistor.    6.11.5 DIGITAL   INPUTS    This   section   displays   the   state   of   the   digital   inputs   as   read   by   the   Controller   Board.   The   digital   inputs   on   pins   1   and   5   feed   through   a   series   150k Ω  resistor,   through   a   buffer,   to   the   microprocessor.   The   digital   input   on   pin   7   feeds   through   a   series   100 Ω  resistor,   through   a   buffer,   to   the   microprocessor.   The   input   voltages   are   clamped   between   0.6V   below   ground   and   0.6V   above   the   I/O   supply   voltage.   The   I/O   Supply   Voltage   level   will   affect   the   decision   threshold   between   a   high   and   low   state   on   the   digital   inputs.   Select   the   I/O   Supply   voltage   level   corresponding   to   the   digital   logic   levels   in   use.   See   Appendix   A   for   a   complete   list   of   Alarm   Port   specification.   6.11.6 ANALOG   INPUTS    This   section   displays   the   analog   voltage   read   by   the   analog ‐ to ‐ digital   converter   input   from   Pin   7   of   the   Alarm   Port.   The   analog   input   on   pin   7   feeds   through   a   series   100 Ω  resistor   before   being   read   by   the   ADC.   The   input   voltages   are   clamped   between   0.6V   below   ground   and   0.6V   above   the   I/O   supply   voltage.   6.11.7 CONNECTING   WIRE   TO   THE   SPRING   LOADED   CONNECTOR   The   Base   Station   is   supplied   with   an   8   pin   plug   that   will   mate   to   the   8   pin   header   on   the   Alarm   Port.   The   plug   features   a   spring   loaded   retention   clamp   to   make   inserting   and   removing   the   wire/cable   as   simple   as   possible.   To   connect   a   wire(s)   to   the   plug   follow   the   instructions   below.   Figure   34  ‐  Inserting   wire   into   the   Alarm   Port   Plug    

42.   42   |   Page     6.8.1 SNMP   CONFIGURATION    6.8.1.1 SNMP   Selecting   Enable   will   allow   the   SNMP   functionality.   Selecting   Disable   will   shut   off   SNMP   functionality.    6.8.1.2 READ ‐ ONLY   COMMUNITY   NAME   This   field   sets   the   community   string   used   for   accessing   the   read ‐ only   Management   Information   Bases   (MIBs).    6.8.1.3 READ ‐ WRITE   COMMUNITY   NAME   This   field   sets   the   community   string   used   for   accessing   all   Management   Information   Bases   (MIBs)   including   writable   MIBs.   6.8.1.4 TRAP   COMMUNITY   NAME   This   field   sets   the   community   string   used   when   sending   traps.    6.8.1.5 MIBS   Right ‐ click   the   “Download   mibs.zip”   link   and   select   "Save   Target   As..."   to   save   a   zip   file   of   the   controller ‐ specific   MIBs.    Once   the   zip   file   is   downloaded   onto   your   computer,   extract   the   files.    Then,   the   base   station   controller   specific   MIBs   can   be   loaded   into   any   third   party   MIB   browser.   6.8.2 SNMP   TRAPS   CONFIGURATION    Check   the   box   next   to   a   trap   to   enable   it.   Uncheck   the   box   to   disable   that   trap.   The   traps   listed   in   the   table   below   are   available   in   the   base   station   controller.     Table   10   –   SNMP   Trap   Descriptions   SNMP   Trap   Name   Description Board   Alive     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   the   Controller   board   boots   up.   Board   Error   Detected     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   an   error   is   detected   with   the   Controller   board. Board   Error   Cleared     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   errors   are   cleared   from   the   Controller   board. Radio   A   Error   Detected     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   an   error   is   detected   with   Radio   A. Radio   A   Error   Cleared     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   Radio   A   errors   are   cleared.   Errors   are   cleared   when   the   “Clear   Errors”   button   on   the   Radio   Settings  ‐ >   Diagnostics   webpage   is   pressed,   or   when   the   Alarm   On/Off   button   on   the   Base   Station’s   front   panel   is   held   for   5   seconds.    Radio   B   Error   Detected     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   an   error   is   detected   with   Radio   B.

17.   17   |   Page     2.1.4   VERTICAL   DIPOLES   Vertical   dipoles   are   very   often   mounted   in   pairs,   or   sometimes   groups   of   3   or   4,   to   achieve   even   coverage   and   to   increase   gain.   The   vertical   collinear   antenna   usually   consists   of   several   elements   stacked   one   above   the   other   to   achieve   similar   results.   Figure   8  ‐  Antenna   Types   Omni   (Vertical   Collinear)   Yagi   Vertical   Dipole         2.1.5 RF   EXPOSURE   COMPLIANCE   REQUIREMENTS   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   is   intended   for   use   in   the   Industrial   Monitoring   and   Control   and   SCADA   markets.   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   must   be   professionally   installed   and   must   ensure   a   minimum   separation   distance   between   the   radiating   structure   and   any   person.   See   the   individual   radio   user   manuals   for   a   listing   of   the   minimum   safety   distance.    Figure   9  ‐  RF   Exposure   Compliance   Minimum   Safety   Distances   Reference   Radio   User   Manual   Part   Number Phantom   II   001 ‐ 5199 ‐ 200   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   uses   a   low   power   radio   frequency   transmitter.   The   concentrated   energy   from   an   antenna   may   pose   a   health   hazard.   People   should   not   be   in   front   of   the   antenna   when   the   transmitter   is   operating.     The   installer   of   this   equipment   must   ensure   the   antenna   is   located   or   pointed   such   that   it   does   not   emit   an   RF   field   in   excess   of   Health   Canada   limits   for   the   general   population.   Recommended   safety   guidelines   for   the   human   exposure   to   radio   frequency   electromagnetic   energy   are   contained   in   the   Canadian   Safety   Code   6   (available   from   Health   Canada)   and   the   Federal   Communications   Commission   (FCC)   Bulletin   65.     Any   changes   or   modifications   not   expressly   approved   by   the   party   responsible   for   compliance   (in   the   country   where   used)   could   void   the   user's   authority   to   operate   the   equipment.     MAXIMUM   EIRP   FCC   Regulations   allow   up   to   36dBm   Effective   Isotropic   Radiated   Power   (EIRP).    Therefore,   the   sum   of   the   transmitted   power   (in   dBm),   the   cabling   loss   and   the   antenna   gain   cannot   exceed   36dBm.    

50.   50   |   Page     6.11.3 RELAY   SETTINGS   To   adjust   the   options   for   the   relays,   use   the   pull   down   menus   under   the   Relay   Settings   section.   Depending   upon   which   type   of   Base   Station   you   are   using,   there   will   be   either   two   or   three   options   available   for   the   relays.   A   summary   of   the   options   is   listed   in   the   table   below.   Table   11  ‐  Relay   Setting   Options   Relay   1   Description Not   Energized   Shorts   pins   4   and   6 Energized   Shorts   pins   4   and   2 Auto:   Indicates   Error   Status   (Redundant   Base   Station   only)   Indicates   if   an   error   has   been   detected.    Not   Energized   =   Error   Detected   with   radio(s)      Energized   =   No   Errors   Detected   Relay   2   Description Not   Energized/Digital   Input   Shorts   pins   3   and   5 Select   this   mode   when   using   Pins   1   and   5   as   Digital   Inputs    Energized   Shorts   pins   3   and   1 Auto:   Indicates   Active   Radio   (Redundant   Base   Station   only)   Indicates   which   radio   is   currently   in   use.    Not   Energized   =   Radio   A   is   in   use      Energized   =   Radio   B   is   in   use   6.11.4 INPUT/OUTPUT   SETTINGS   6.11.4.1 SUPPLY   VOLTAGE   The   user   can   select   the   supply   voltage   for   the   digital   and   analog   logic   on   the   Alarm   Port.   The   supply   voltage   may   be   set   to   either   1.8V   or   3.3V.   The   voltage   source   supplies   voltage   to   the   following:     Digital   Inputs   on   Pins   1,   5,   and   7    Digital   Output   on   Pin   7     Analog   Input   on   Pin   7   The   analog ‐ to ‐ digital   converter   (ADC)   supply   is   fixed   at   3.3V,   but   the   analog   input   on   Pin   7   will   be   clamped   0.6V   above   the   user   settable   supply   voltage.    Changing   this   supply   voltage   will   not   affect   the   operation   of   the   relays.    6.11.4.2 PIN   7   FUNCTION    This   setting   determines   the   function   of   pin   7:   Digital/Analog   Input   or   Digital   Output.   When   this   pin   is   configured   as   an   input,   both   the   analog   voltage   and   the   digital   state   of   the   pin   will   be   reported   on   the   web   page.       

36.   36   |   Page     6.5.1 LAN   CONFIGURATION   These   settings   can   be   modified   to   change   the   IP   address   and   subnet   mask   of   the   Base   Station’s   Controller   Board.   6.5.1.1 ETHERNET   IP   ADDRESS   This   setting   can   be   changed   to   alter   the   IP   address   of   the   Base   Station.   The   default   IP   address   is   192.168.205.254.   When   a   new   IP   address   is   entered,   it   will   take   effect   immediately   upon   clicking   the   Save   button.   Reconfigure   the   network   card   in   your   PC   to   access   the   new   subnet,   if   needed,   then   enter   the   new   IP   address   in   the   address   bar   of   the   web   browser.   6.5.1.2 ETHERNET   SUBNET   MASK   This   setting   can   be   changed   to   alter   the   subnet   mask   of   the   Base   Station.   The   default   is   255.255.255.0.   6.5.2 ADMINISTRATION   These   settings   affect   the   Base   Station’s   security   and   how   a   user   is   allowed   to   connect   to   the   Base   Station.   6.5.2.1 ADMIN   PASSWORD/CONFIRM   PASSWORD   This   setting   can   be   used   to   change   the   user’s   password.   The   default   password   is   “admin”.   It   is   recommended   that   this   be   changed   immediately   upon   installation.   The   confirm   password   field   is   used   to   ensure   correct   spelling.   6.5.2.2 FRIENDLY   IP   ADDRESS   Specifies   the   IP   address   from   which   remote   administration   is   permitted.   Entering   0.0.0.0   will   allow   any   IP   address.   Leave   the   fifth   box   blank   (after   the   /)   if   specifying   a   specific   IP,   or   0.0.0.0.   A   subnet   mask   may   be   entered   in   the   fifth   box.   The   mask   indicates   how   many   bits   of   the   IP   address   to   match.   This   can   be   a   value   from   1   to   32.   6.5.2.3 APPLY   FRIENDLY   IP   ADDRESS   Check   the   box   next   to   a   service   to   allow   access   to   the   service   only   from   the   friendly   IP   address.   Unchecking   the   box   will   allow   access   from   a   computer   with   any   IP   address.   6.5.2.4 SSH   PORT/TELNET   PORTS   Enter   the   port   number   that   will   be   used   for   access   to   the   service.   Entering   zero   for   the   port   number   will   block   access   to   the   service.        

60.   60   |   Page     7 APPENDIX   A:   BASE   STATION   SPECIFICATIONS   These   specifications   are   subject   to   change   without   notice.   General     Power   Source   11 ‐ 30   VDC,   Negative   GND RF   Impedance    50  Ω  Operating   Temperature    ‐ 30°   to   +   60°   C Storage   Temperature  ‐ 40°   to   +   85°   C Operating   Humidity    5%   to   95%   non ‐ condensing   RH Rx   Current   Drain   at   25°C   with   one   radio   powered.     DC   Input   11V DC   Input   20V   DC   Input   30V     All   Relays   On   All   Relays   Off   1.3 A   (max) 1.1   A   (typ)   900   A   (typ)   950 A   (max)   780   mA   (typ)   650   mA   (typ)   650   mA   (max) 540   mA(typ)   430   mA(typ)   Tx   Current   Drain   at   25°C   with   one   radio   powered.   Power   Out DC   Input   11V DC   Input   20V   DC   Input   30V   Tx   Pwr:   1W All   Relays   On   All   Relays   Off   2.6   A   (max) 2.1   A   (typ)   1.9   A   (typ)   1.7   A   (max)   1.4   A   (typ)   1.2   A   (typ)   1.1   A   (max) 880   mA   (typ)   860   mA   (typ)   Cold   start   60   seconds Nominal   Dimensions    Chassis:   16"   W   x   4.75”   H   x   11.375"   D   (41   x   12   x   29   cm)    Front   Panel:   19”   x   5.22”   x   0.25”   (48   x   13   x   0.6   cm)   Shipping   Weight   Standard:   11.5   lbs.   (5.2   kg)   Redundant:   15   lbs.   (6.8   kg)   Mounting   Options   19”   Rack   Mount    RF   Specifications   See   radio   specifications   and   user   manual FCC   /   IC   Certifications   See   radio   specifications   and   user   manual    Display     11   Status   LEDs   (Standard)   15   Status   LEDs   (Redundant)   Controller   LEDs:   Power,   Status,   Fan   Error Data   LEDs:   COM   Data,   Setup   Data,   Link/Act   1,   Link/Act   2   Radio   LEDs:   Power,   Error,   Link/Act   Other:   Alarm   Disabled,   Manual   Override   (Redundant   Models   only)      Connectors     Antenna   Connector   N   Female   (Tx/Rx) Serial   Setup   Port   DE ‐ 9F   Serial   Com   Port   DE ‐ 9F   Ethernet   RJ ‐ 45   Two   10/100   BaseT   auto ‐ MDIX (The   2   Ethernet   connections   are   connected   internally   to   each   other   and   to   the   radio(s)   with   an   embedded   Ethernet   Switch.)   Main   Power   Power   Header Power   Plug     4   Pin,   5.08mm,   Power   Header 4   Pin,   5.08mm   Power   Header   Cable:   60   inches   Connections:    Aux   Power   A    Ground  

6.   6   |   Page     1.0 BASE   STATION   OVERVIEW    This   document   provides   information   required   for   the   operation   of   the   Phantom   II   Base   Station.   The   information   in   this   manual   makes   the   assumption   the   user’s   PC   has   an   NIC   (Network   Interface   Card)   with   TCP/IP   implemented.   Setup   requires   the   knowledge   and   authorization   to   modify   the   TCP/IP   settings   for   the   NIC.    Changing   or   installing   new   IP   addresses   in   a   network   can   cause   serious   network   problems.   If   you   have   any   questions   or   concerns,   contact   the   Network   Administrator   for   your   system.    1.1 GENERAL   DESCRIPTION   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   is   available   in   three   options:   standard,   repeater,   and   redundant.   The   Standard   Base   Station   uses   a   single   radio   to   transmit   and   receive   data   from   remote   radios.   The   Repeater   Base   Station   uses   two   radios   connected   back   to   back   to   extend   the   range   of   a   signal.   The   Redundant   Base   Station   uses   two   radios,   activating   only   one   at   a   time,   in   order   to   provide   a   fail ‐ safe   in   the   event   of   a   radio   failure.   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   has   a   main   controller   PC   board   which   is   accessible   via   HTML   web   pages.   Access   the   Controller’s   web   pages   to   configure   the   user   programmable   settings   and   to   view   the   status   of   the   Base   Station.     Rugged   Packaging.   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   is   housed   in   a   rugged,   19”   rack   mountable,   aluminum   case.   Built   for   industrial   applications   in   a   variety   of   environments,   the   Phantom   II   Base   Station   operates   over   an   extended   temperature   range   and   provides   worry ‐ free   operation   in   the   roughest   environments.   Simple   Installation.   Basic   installation   typically   utilizes   an   omni ‐ directional   antenna   at   the   Phantom   II   Base   Station   or   Relay   Point   and   a   directional   antenna   at   each   remote   site   that   is   not   a   Relay   Point.   See   Section   2   for   information   on   Site   and   Antenna   Selection.   For   basic   service,   just   hook   up   an   antenna,   connect   your   Ethernet   LAN   to   the   Base   Station’s   LAN   port,   apply   primary   power,   and   check   and   set   operating   parameters.   Flexible   Management.   Configuration,   commissioning,   maintenance   and   troubleshooting   can   be   done   locally   or   remotely.   All   operating   parameters   can   be   set   via   a   web   browser.      

45.   45   |   Page     6.9.1 QOS   BASIC   CONFIGURATION   QoS:   Select   "Enable"   to   use   the   QoS   module.   Select   "Disable"   to   turn   it   off.    Max   Rate:   Sets   the   maximum   data   rate   allowed   by   the   QoS   module   (in   kilobits   per   second).    Default   Queue:   Sets   the   queue   through   which   all   traffic   will   flow   unless   otherwise   filtered.   If   no   queue   is   selected,   then   unfiltered   traffic   will   bypass   the   QoS   module.    When   changes   are   made   to   the   QoS   Basic   Configuration,   the   Save   button   must   be   pressed   for   the   changes   to   take   effect.   6.9.2 QOS   QUEUE   CONFIGURATION    The   QoS   contains   five   queues,   which   can   each   be   configured   independently   to   throttle   traffic   to   different   rates.   Enable:   Check   "Enable"   to   use   the   queue.    Rate:   Sets   the   guaranteed   rate   at   which   traffic   flows   through   the   queue.   The   sum   of   this   value   for   all   enabled   queues   cannot   exceed   the   Max   Rate   set   in   the   QoS   Basic   Configuration.    Ceiling:   Sets   the   maximum   rate   that   traffic   can   flow   through   the   queue.   This   value   cannot   be   set   higher   than   the   Max   Rate   set   in   the   QoS   Basic   Configuration   for   any   individual   queue.    Buffer   Size:   Sets   how   many   packets   can   be   queued   up   in   the   queue.   If   this   buffer   is   exceeded   the   packets   will   be   dropped.   When   changes   are   made   to   the   QoS   Queue   Configuration,   the   Save   button   must   be   pressed   for   the   changes   to   take   effect.   6.9.3 FILTER    Filters   can   be   configured   to   route   traffic   to   specific   queues.   Filters   can   be   created   that   match   on   one   or   more   of   the   following   parameters.   Source   IP   Address:   Enter   the   source   IP   address   to   match.   The   Net   Mask   can   be   specified   to   match   on   a   either   a   rnage   of   IP   addresses   or   on   an   individual   address.    Leave   as   0.0.0.0/0   to   ignore   the   source   IP   address.   Example:      10.1.1.0/24    This   filter   matches   all   IP   addresses   from   10.1.1.0   to   10.1.1.255      10.1.1.43/32    This   filter   matches   on   ly   one   IP   address:   10.1.1.43   Source   Port:   Enter   the   source   port   to   match.   Leave   as   0   to   ignore   the   source   port.    Destination   IP   Address:   Enter   the   destination   IP   address   to   match.   Leave   as   0.0.0.0/0   to   ignore   the   destination   IP   address.  

4. TABLE   OF   CONTENTS   1.0   BASE   STATION   OVERVIEW   ............................................................................................................................... ...................   6   1.1   General   Description   ............................................................................................................................... .................................   6   1.1.1   Phantom   II   Standard   Base   Station   Block   Diagram   242 ‐ 5199 ‐ 200   ...................................................................................   7   1.1.2   Phantom   II   Redundant   Base   Station   Block   Diagram   242 ‐ 5399 ‐ 200   ................................................................................   8   1.2   Physical   Description   ............................................................................................................................... .................................   8   1.2.1   LED   Panel   ............................................................................................................................... .........................................   9   1.2.2   Ethernet   LAN   Ports   ............................................................................................................................... ........................   10   1.2.3   Diagnostic   and   Data   Ports   ............................................................................................................................... .............   10   1.2.4   Alarm   Port   ............................................................................................................................... .....................................   11   1.2.5   Radio   I/O   Port   ............................................................................................................................... ................................   11   1.2.6   Power   Connector   ............................................................................................................................... ...........................   12   1.2.7   Antenna   Connector   ............................................................................................................................... .......................   13   1.2.8   Reset   Button   ............................................................................................................................... ..................................   13   1.2.9   Chassis   Dimensions   ............................................................................................................................... .......................   13   1.3   Part   Numbers   and   Availability   ............................................................................................................................... ................   14   1.3.1   Base   Station   ............................................................................................................................... ...................................   14   1.3.2   Accessories   and   Options   ............................................................................................................................... ................   14   1.4   Product   Warranty   ............................................................................................................................... ...................................   15   1.5   RMA   Request   ............................................................................................................................... ..........................................   15   1.6   Documentation   and   Downloads   ............................................................................................................................... .............   15   2.0   SYSTEM   ARCHITECTURE   AND   PLANNING   ...........................................................................................................................   16   2.1   Selecting   Antenna   and   Feedline   ............................................................................................................................... .............   16   2.1.1   Antenna   Gain   ............................................................................................................................... .................................   16   2.1.2   Omni   Directional   Antenna   ............................................................................................................................... .............   16   2.1.3   Yagi   Antenna   ............................................................................................................................... .................................   16   2.1.4   Vertical   Dipoles   ............................................................................................................................... ..............................   17   2.1.5   RF   Exposure   Compliance   Requirements   .......................................................................................................................   17   3.0   BASE   STATION   QUICK   START   ............................................................................................................................... ..............   18   3.1   Connecting   to   the   Phantom   II   Base   Station   and   Radios   ........................................................................................................   18   3.1.1   Setup   and   Configuration   ............................................................................................................................... ................   18   3.1.2   Install   the   Antenna   ............................................................................................................................... ........................   18   3.1.3   Connect   Primary   Power   ............................................................................................................................... .................   18   3.1.4   Connect   Base   Station   to   Programming   PC   ....................................................................................................................   18   3.1.5   LAN   Setup   ............................................................................................................................... ......................................   19   3.1.6   Network   Login   ............................................................................................................................... ...............................   20   3.1.7   Initial   Installation   Login   ............................................................................................................................... .................   20   3.2   Configure   a   Phantom   II   Standard   Base   Station   .....................................................................................................................   20   3.3   Configure   a   Phantom   II   Redundant   Base   Station   ..................................................................................................................   22   4.0   BASE   STATION   OVERVIEW   ............................................................................................................................... .................   26   4.1   Phantom   II   Standard   Base   Station   Overview   .........................................................................................................................   26   4.2   Phantom   II   Redundant   Base   Station   Overview   .....................................................................................................................   26   4.2.1   Phantom   II   Failure   Detection   ............................................................................................................................... .........   26   4.2.2   When   a   Failure   is   Detected   ............................................................................................................................... ...........   27   4.2.3   Radio   Setup   for   a   Redundant   System   ...........................................................................................................................   28   5.0   FRONT   PANEL   LEDS   AND   BUTTONS   ............................................................................................................................... ....   29   5.1   Front   Panel   Buttons   ............................................................................................................................... ...............................   29   5.2   LED   Functions   ............................................................................................................................... .........................................   31   6.0   BASE   STATION   WEB   MANAGEMENT   ............................................................................................................................... ..   32   6.1   Navigating   the   Network   Management   System   .....................................................................................................................   32   6.2   Main   Menu   ............................................................................................................................... .............................................   32   6.3   Home   ............................................................................................................................... ......................................................   33   6.3.1   Controller   Ethernet   Settings   ............................................................................................................................... ..........   33   6.3.2   System   Information   ............................................................................................................................... .......................   34   6.3.3   Radio   Information   ............................................................................................................................... .........................   34   6.4   Setup   Wizard   ............................................................................................................................... ..........................................   34   6.5   Controller   Setup   (Basic)   ............................................................................................................................... ..........................   35   6.5.1   LAN   Configuration   ............................................................................................................................... .........................   36   6.5.2   Administration   ............................................................................................................................... ...............................   36   6.5.3   RADIUS   Settings   ............................................................................................................................... .............................   37   6.5.4   Alarm   Settings   ............................................................................................................................... ...............................   37  

26.   26   |   Page     4.0 BASE   STATION   OVERVIEW   4.1 PHANTOM   II   STANDARD   BASE   STATION   OVERVIEW   The   Standard   Base   Station   consists   of   one   Phantom   II   in   a   19”   rack   mount   enclosure.   The   Standard   Base   Station   features   two   10/100   BaseT   Auto ‐ MDIX   Ethernet   connections   and   an   I/O   Port   which   can   be   controlled   or   monitored   from   the   Base   Station   Controller’s   web   pages.   Both   external   Ethernet   connections   are   connected   with   an   embedded   Ethernet   switch   to   the   radio.   The   Standard   Base   Station   provides   access   to   the   Diagnostic,   Data,   and   RS485/422   ports   of   the   Phantom   II.   4.2 PHANTOM   II   REDUNDANT   BASE   STATION   OVERVIEW   The   Redundant   Base   Station   has   two   Phantom   IIs   with   identical   RF   and   Ethernet   MAC   addresses,   a   Controller   board,   and   an   RF   antenna   relay   inside   the   19”   rack   mount   chassis.   The   Redundant   Base   Station   features   two   10/100   BaseT   Auto ‐ MDIX   Ethernet   connections   and   an   I/O   Port   which   can   be   controlled   or   monitored   from   the   Base   Station   Controller’s   web   pages.   Both   external   Ethernet   connections   are   connected   with   an   embedded   Ethernet   switch   to   the   radios.   The   Base   Station   provides   connections   to   the   Diagnostic   port,   Data   port,   and   the   RS485/422   port   of   the   active   Phantom   II.   The   Ethernet,   Diagnostic,   Data,   and   RS485/422   ports   are   automatically   routed   by   the   Controller   Board   to   whichever   Phantom   II   is   currently   in   use.   4.2.1 PHANTOM   II   FAILURE   DETECTION   The   Controller   Board   has   a   microprocessor   that   is   continually   monitoring   the   status   of   the   active   Phantom   II   via   an   Ethernet   connection.   If   enabled,   the   Controller   Board   also   has   the   ability   to   send   out   a   ping   to   a   remote   unit   periodically   to   verify   the   active   Phantom   II   is   still   capable   of   transmitting   and   receiving   data.    4.2.1.1 MONITOR   PHANTOM   II   WITH   ETHERNET   CONNECTION   The   Controller   Board   will   attempt   to   establish   a   telnet   connection   to   the   Phantom   II   currently   in   use.   The   user   must   tell   the   Controller   Board   the   correct   IP   address,   user   name   and   password   of   the   Phantom   II   so   the   Controller   Board   can   establish   a   telnet   connection.   This   information   must   be   entered   into   the   Base   Station   Controller   Board’s   Radio   Settings   web   page.   Once   the   telnet   connection   has   been   established   the   Controller   Board   will   periodically   monitor   the   temperature   in   the   Phantom   II   and   flag   an   error   is   temperature   exceeds   the   maximum   threshold   as   listed   in   the   Table   7   below.    The   Controller   Board   will   also   verify   the   radio’s   Ethernet   interface   is   still   operational.   If   a   telnet   connection   cannot   be   established   or   the   Phantom   II   fails   to   respond   to   a   diagnostic   query,   the   Base   Station   will   flag   an   error   and   switch   to   the   backup   radio.        

16.   16   |   Page     2.0 SYSTEM   ARCHITECTURE   AND   PLANNING   2.1 SELECTING   ANTENNA   AND   FEEDLINE   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   can   be   used   with   a   variety   of   antenna   types.   The   exact   style   used   depends   on   the   physical   size   and   layout   of   a   system.    2.1.1   ANTENNA   GAIN   Antenna   gain   is   usually   measured   in   comparison   to   a   dipole.   A   dipole   acts   much   like   the   filament   of   a   flashlight   bulb:   it   radiates   energy   in   almost   all   directions.   One   bulb   like   this   would   provide   very   dim   room   lighting.   Add   a   reflector   capable   of   concentrating   all   the   energy   into   a   narrow   angle   of   radiation   and   you   have   a   flashlight.   Within   that   bright   spot   on   the   wall,   the   light   might   be   a   thousand   times   greater   than   it   would   be   without   the   reflector.   The   resulting   bulb ‐ reflector   combination   has   a   gain   of   1000,   or   30   dB,   compared   to   the   bulb   alone.   Gain   can   be   achieved   by   concentrating   the   energy   both   vertically   and   horizontally,   as   in   the   case   of   the   flashlight   and   Yagi   antenna.   Gain   can   be   also   be   achieved   by   reducing   the   vertical   angle   of   radiation,   leaving   the   horizontal   alone.   In   this   case,   the   antenna   will   radiate   equally   in   all   horizontal   directions,   but   will   take   energy   that   otherwise   would   have   gone   skywards   and   use   it   to   increase   the   horizontal   radiation.   The   required   antenna   impedance   is   50   ohms.   To   reduce   potential   radio   interference,   the   antenna   type   and   its   gain   should   be   chosen   to   ensure   the   effective   isotropic   radiated   power   (EIRP)   is   not   more   than   required   for   successful   communication.   See   Table   5   for   a   list   of   tested   antenna   recommendations.   Similar   antenna   types   from   other   manufacturers   are   equally   acceptable.   It   is   important   to   follow   the   manufacturer’s   recommended   installation   procedures   and   instructions   when   mounting   any   antenna.   2.1.2   OMNI   DIRECTIONAL   ANTENNA   In   general,   an   omni   directional   antenna   should   be   used   at   a   master   station   and   at   relay   points.   This   allows   equal   coverage   to   all   of   the   remote   locations.   Omni   directional   antennas   are   designed   to   radiate   the   RF   signal   in   a   360 ‐ degree   pattern   around   the   antenna.   Short   range   antennas   such   as   folded   dipoles   and   ground   independent   whips   are   used   to   radiate   the   signal   in   a   ball   shaped   pattern   while   high   gain   omni   antennas,   such   as   a   collinear   antenna,   compress   the   RF   radiation   sphere   into   the   horizontal   plane   to   provide   a   relatively   flat   disc   shaped   pattern   that   travels   further   because   more   of   the   energy   is   radiated   in   the   horizontal   plane.    2.1.3   YAGI   ANTENNA   At   remote   locations   (not   used   as   a   relay   point),   a   directional   Yagi   is   generally   recommended   to   minimize   interference   to   and   from   other   users.      

63.   63   |   Page     APPENDIX   C:   DEFINITIONS     Access   Point:   Communication   hub   for   users   to   connect   to   a   LAN.   Access   Points   are   important   for   providing   heightened   wireless   security   and   for   extending   the   physical   range   of   wireless   service   accessibility   Airlink:   Physical   radio   frequency   connections   used   for   communications   between   units   ARP:   Address   Resolution   Protocol   –   Maps   Internet   address   to   physical   address   Backbone:   The   part   of   a   network   connecting   of   the   bulk   of   the   systems   and   networks   together  ‐  handling   the   most   data   Bandwidth:   The   transmission   capacity   of   a   given   device   or   network   Browser:   An   application   program   providing   the   interface   to   view   and   interact   with   all   the   information   on   the   World   Wide   Web   COM   Port:   Both   RS ‐ 232   serial   communications   ports   of   the   Radio   wireless   radio   modem.   Configured   as   DCE   and   designed   to   connect   directly   to   a   DTE    Default   Gateway:   A   device   forwarding   Internet   traffic   from   your   local   area   network   DCE   (Data   Communications   Equipment):   This   designation   is   applied   to   equipment   like   modems.   DCE   is   designed   to   connect   to   DTE   DHCP   (Dynamic   Host   Configuration   Protocol):   A   networking   protocol   that   allows   administrators   to   assign   temporary   IP   addresses   to   network   computers   by   "leasing"   an   IP   address   to   a   user   for   a   limited   amount   of   time,   instead   of   assigning   permanent   IP   addresses   DNS   (Domain   Name   Server):   Translates   the   domain   name   into   an   IP   address   Domain:   A   specific   name   for   a   network   of   computers   DTE   (Data   Terminal   Equipment):   This   designation   is   applied   to   equipment   such   as   terminals,   PCs,   RTUs,   PLCs,   etc.   DTE   is   designed   to   connect   to   DCE   Dynamic   IP   Address:   A   temporary   IP   address   assigned   by   a   DHCP   server   Ethernet:   IEEE   standard   network   protocol   that   specifies   how   data   is   placed   on   and   retrieved   from   a   common   transmission   medium   Firewall:   A   set   of   related   programs   located   at   a   network   gateway   server   that   protects   the   resources   of   a   network   from   users   on   other   networks   Firmware:   The   embedded   programming   code   running   a   networking   device   Fragmentation:   Breaking   a   packet   into   smaller   units   when   transmitting   over   a   network   medium   that   cannot   support   the   original   size   of   the   packet   FTP   (File   Transfer   Protocol):   A   protocol   used   to   transfer   files   over   a   TCP/IP   network   Gateway:   A   device   interconnecting   networks   with   different,   incompatible   communications   protocols   HDX   (Half   Duplex):   Data   transmission   occurring   in   two   directions   over   a   single   line,   using   separate   Tx   and   Rx   frequencies,   but   only   one   direction   at   a   time   HTTP   (HyperText   Transport   Protocol):   Communications   protocol   used   to   connect   to   servers   on   the   World   Wide   Web   IPCONFIG:   A   Windows   2000   and   XP   utility   that   displays   the   IP   address   for   a   particular   networking   device   MAC   (Media   Access   Control):   The   unique   address   a   manufacturer   assigns   to   each   networking   device   MTU   (Maximum   Transmission   Unit):   The   largest   TCP/IP   packet   hardware   can   carry  

64.   64   |   Page     NAT   (Network   Address   Translation):   NAT   technology   translates   IP   addresses   of   a   local   area   network   to   a   different   IP   address   for   the   Internet   Network:   A   series   of   computers   or   devices   connected   for   the   purpose   of   data   sharing,   storage,   and/or   transmission   between   users   Network   speed:   Bit   rate   on   the   RF   link   between   units   in   a   network    Node:   A   network   junction   or   connection   point,   typically   a   computer   or   work   station   OIP   (Optimized   IP):   Compresses   TCP   and   UDP   headers,   and   filters   unnecessary   acknowledgments.   OIP   makes   the   most   use   of   the   available   bandwidth   OTA   (Over   the   Air):   Standard   for   the   transmission   and   reception   of   application ‐ related   information   in   a   wireless   communications   system   PHY:   A   PHY   chip   (called   PHYceiver)   provides   the   interface   to   Ethernet   transmission   medium.   Its   purpose   is   digital   access   of   the   modulated   link   (usually   used   together   with   an   MII ‐ chip).   The   PHY   defines   data   rates   and   transmission   method   parameters   Ping   (Packet   Internet   Groper):   An   Internet   utility   used   to   determine   whether   a   particular   IP   address   is   online   PLC   (Programmable   Logic   Controller):   An   intelligent   device   that   can   make   decisions,   gather   and   report   information,   and   control   other   devices   RIPv2:   Dynamic   IP   routing   protocol   based   on   the   distance   vector   algorithm   Router:   A   networking   device   connecting   multiple   networks    RS ‐ 232:   Industry–standard   interface   for   data   transfer   RTU   (Remote   Terminal   Unit):   A   SCADA   device   used   to   gather   information   or   control   other   devices   SCADA   (Supervisory   Control   and   Data   Acquisition):   A   general   term   referring   to   systems   gathering   data   and/or   performing   control   operations   SNTP   (Simple   Network   Time   Protocol):   Protocol   for   synchronizing   clocks   of   computer   systems   over   packet ‐ switched,   variable ‐ latency   data   networks.   Uses   UDP   as   its   transport   layer   Static   IP   Address:   A   fixed   address   assigned   to   a   computer   or   device   connected   to   a   network   Static   Routing:   Forwarding   data   in   a   network   via   a   fixed   path   Subnet   Mask:   An   Ethernet   address   code   determining   network   size    Switch:   A   device   connecting   computing   devices   to   host   computers,   allowing   a   large   number   of   devices   to   share   a   limited   number   of   ports    TCP   (Transmission   Control   Protocol):   A   network   protocol   for   transmitting   data   that   requires   acknowledgement   from   the   recipient   of   data   sent   TCP/IP   (Transmission   Control   Protocol/Internet   Protocol):   A   set   of   protocols   for   network   communications   Telnet:   User   command   and   TCP/IP   protocol   used   for   accessing   remote   PCs   TFTP   (Trivial   File   Transfer   Protocol):   UDP/IP   based   file   transfer   protocol   Topology:   The   physical   layout   of   a   network   Transparent:   Device   capable   of   transmitting   all   data   without   regard   to   special   characters,   etc   Terminal   Server:   Acts   as   a   converter   between   Ethernet/IP   and   RS ‐ 232   protocols   UDP   (User   Datagram   Protocol):   Network   protocol   for   transmitting   data   that   does   not   require   acknowledgement   from   the   recipient   of   the   sent   data    Upgrade:   To   replace   existing   software   or   firmware   with   a   newer   version   URL   (Universal   Resource   Locator):   The   address   of   a   file   located   on   the   Internet  

43.   43   |   Page     Radio   B   Error   Cleared     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   Radio   B   errors   are   cleared.   Errors   are   cleared   when   the   “Clear   Errors”   button   on   the   Radio   Settings  ‐ >   Diagnostics   webpage   is   pressed,   or   when   the   Alarm   On/Off   button   on   the   Base   Station’s   front   panel   is   held   for   5   seconds.   Fan   Error   Detected     A   trap   is   generated   when   the   Controller   detects   that   either   of   the   two   fans   have   stopped   spinning.   Fan   Error   Cleared     A   trap   is   generated   when   the   Controller   detects   that   both   fans   are   operating   normally   again   after   an   error   condition   had   occurred.   Alarm   Pin   1   Low   to   High     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   a   low   to   high   transition   is   detected   on   Pin   1   of   the   Alarm   Port.   Alarm   Pin   1   High   to   Low     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   a   high   to   low   transition   is   detected   on   Pin   1   of   the   Alarm   Port.   Alarm   Pin   5   Low   to   High     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   a   low   to   high   transition   is   detected   on   Pin   5   of   the   Alarm   Port.   Alarm   Pin   5   High   to   Low     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   a   high   to   low   transition   is   detected   on   Pin   5   of   the   Alarm   Port.   Alarm   Pin   7   Low   to   High     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   a   low   to   high   transition   is   detected   on   Pin   7   of   the   Alarm   Port.   Alarm   Pin   7   High   to   Low     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   a   high   to   low   transition   is   detected   on   Pin   7   of   the   Alarm   Port.   Alarm   Pin   7   Analog   Voltage   High     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   the   Analog   Voltage   on   Pin   7   of   the   Alarm   Port   exceeds   the   upper   voltage   threshold   programmed   by   the   user.   Alarm   Pin   7   Analog   Voltage   Low     A   trap   is   generated   whenever   the   Analog   Voltage   on   Pin   7   of   the   Alarm   Port   falls   below   the   lower   voltage   threshold   programmed   by   the   user.   Alarm   Pin   7   Analog   Voltage   In   Range    A   trap   is   generated   whenever   the   Analog   Voltage   on   Pin   7   of   the   Alarm   Port   returns   to   a   value   between   the   lower   and   upper   voltage   threshold   programmed   by   the   user.   6.8.2.1 PIN   7   VOLTAGE   RANGE   Enter   the   voltage   thresholds   (low   and   high)   that   will   be   used   to   generate   the   Alarm   Pin   7   Analog   Voltage   traps.   The   analog   to   digital   converter   can   report   voltages   from   0V   up   to   the   I/O   Supply   Voltage.    The   I/O   Supply   Voltage   is   user   selectable,   and   can   be   set   to   either   1.8V   or   3.3V.   See   appendix   A   for   Alarm   Port   electrical   specifications.   6.8.3 SNMP   TRAP   SINK    6.8.3.1 TRAP   SINK   IP   The   Trap   Sink   IP   allows   the   user   to   enter   in   the   IP   address   of   the   computer(s)   that   are   configured   to   receive   SNMP   traps.   6.8.3.2 TRAP   SINK   PORT   Enter   in   the   port   number   that   the   SNMP   traps   will   be   sent   to.   Most   MIB   browsers   are   set   to   listen   for   traps   on   port   162.   

27.   27   |   Page     Table   7  ‐  Phantom   II   Error   Conditions   Phantom   II   Parameter   Error   Condition Radio   Temperature   Temperature   is   greater   than   80C   Ethernet   Connection   Telnet   connection   cannot   be   established   Phantom   II   does   not   respond   to   diagnostic   query     4.2.1.2 PING   UTILITY   When   the   ping   timer   expires   the   Controller   Board   will   send   a   ping   to   a   remote   IP   address   to   verify   the   Phantom   II   can   both   send   and   receive   data.   If   the   ping   succeeds,   the   ping   timer   is   reset   and   no   errors   are   generated.   If   the   ping   response   is   not   received   within   5   seconds   the   Controller   Board   will   attempt   to   ping   the   secondary   IP.   When   the   max   number   of   retries   has   been   reached   for   both   the   primary   and   secondary   IP   addresses   the   Controller   Board   will   mark   the   Phantom   II   as   bad   and   will   switch   to   the   backup   radio.   If   any   of   the   pings   succeed   the   ping   timer   will   be   reset   and   no   radio   errors   will   be   reported.   The   primary   and   secondary   IP   addresses,   the   ping   timer,   and   the   max   number   of   retries   can   be   programmed   on   the   System   Monitor  ‐ >   Redundant   Setup   web   page.   The   Controller   Board   will   attempt   to   ping   the   primary   IP   address   for   the   max   number   of   retries   and   the   secondary   IP   addresses   for   the   max   number   of   retries   before   flagging   an   error.   4.2.2 WHEN   A   FAILURE   IS   DETECTED   When   a   failure   is   detected   and   the   Redundant   Base   Station   is   set   to   Automatic   Mode,   the   first   radio   will   be   powered   off   and   the   backup   radio   will   be   powered   on.   The   backup   Phantom   II   radio   requires   approximately   60   seconds   to   boot   up   before   being   able   to   send   and   receive   data.   The   Controller   Board   will   immediately   switch   the   Ethernet,   SETUP,   and   COM   connections   to   the   newly   activated   Phantom   II.   When   an   error   is   detected,   the   red   Error   LED   on   the   Base   Station’s   front   panel   will   turn   on   indicating   which   radio   (Radio   A   or   Radio   B)   the   fault   was   detected   with.   The   Controller’s   Diagnostic   web   page   will   report   an   error   message   reporting   which   fault   occurred.   If   the   alarm   is   enabled,   the   buzzer   will   sound   two   short   chirps   every   5   seconds   indicating   there   is   a   failure.   If   programmed   for   automatic   mode,   the   relays   on   the   Alarm   Port   will   switch   indicating   an   error   has   been   detected.   Since   both   the   Phantom   IIs   in   the   Base   Station   have   identical   Ethernet   MAC   addresses,   when   the   radios   are   switched   the   Local   Area   will   not   notice   that   the   Base   Station   has   switched   to   the   backup   Phantom   II.    If   the   Base   Station   radio   is   configured   for   Master   mode,   the   remote   Phantom   IIs   will   resync   to   the   new   Master   quickly   and   data   will   be   allowed   to   flow   over   the   air,   just   as   before.   If   errors   are   detected   with   both   the   primary   and   secondary   radios,   the   Base   Station   Controller   will   try   using   each   radio   a   maximum   of   5   times   each.   After   the   maximum   number   or   switches   has   occurred,   the   Base   Station   Controller   will   flash   the   error   LED   of   both   radios.   Then   the   Controller   will   no   longer   attempt   to   switch   radios.   It   will   leave   one   radio   powered   on   and   will   let   that   radio   try   its   best   to   continue   to   transmit   and   receive   data.  

3. ABOUT   CALAMP   CalAmp   is   a   leading   provider   of   wireless   communications   products   that   enable   anytime/anywhere   access   to   critical   information,   data   and   entertainment   content.   With   comprehensive   capabilities   ranging   from   product   design   and   development   through   volume   production,   CalAmp   delivers   cost ‐ effective   high   quality   solutions   to   a   broad   array   of   customers   and   end   markets.   CalAmp   is   the   leading   supplier   of   Direct   Broadcast   Satellite   (DBS)   outdoor   customer   premise   equipment   to   the   U.S.   satellite   television   market.   The   Company   also   provides   wireless   data   communication   solutions   for   the   telemetry   and   asset   tracking   markets,   private   wireless   networks,   public   safety   communications   and   critical   infrastructure   and   process   control   applications.   For   additional   information,   please   visit   the   Company’s   website   at   www.calamp.com.     IMPORTANT   NOTICE   Because   of   the   nature   of   wireless   communication,   transmission   and   reception   of   data   can   never   be   guaranteed.   Data   may   be   delayed,   corrupted   (i.e.,   have   errors),   or   be   totally   lost.   Significant   delays   or   losses   of   data   are   rare   when   wireless   devices   such   as   the   Phantom   II   Base   Station   are   used   in   a   normal   manner   with   a   well ‐ constructed   network.   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   should   not   be   used   in   situations   where   failure   to   transmit   or   receive   data   could   result   in   damage   of   any   kind   to   the   user   or   any   other   party,   including   but   not   limited   to   personal   injury,   death,   or   loss   of   property.   CalAmp   accepts   no   responsibility   for   damages   of   any   kind   resulting   from   delays   or   errors   in   data   transmitted   or   received   using   the   Base   Station,   or   for   the   failure   of   the   Phantom   II   Base   Station   to   transmit   or   receive   such   data.      COPYRIGHT   NOTICE   ©   Copyright   2009   CalAmp   Products   offered   may   contain   software   proprietary   to   CalAmp.   The   offer   of   supply   of   these   products   and   services   does   not   include   or   infer   any   transfer   of   ownership.   No   part   of   the   documentation   or   information   supplied   may   be   divulged   to   any   third   party   without   the   express   written   consent   of   CalAmp.     RF   EXPOSURE   COMPLIANCE   REQUIREMENTS   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   is   intended   for   use   in   the   Industrial   Monitoring   and   Control   and   SCADA   markets.   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   unit   must   be   professionally   installed   and   must   ensure   a   minimum   separation   distance   between   the   radiating   structure   and   any   person.   See   the   individual   radio   user   manuals   for   a   listing   of   the   minimum   safety   distance.      Radio   User   Manual   Part   Number Phantom   II   001 ‐ 5199 ‐ 200   The   Phantom   II   Base   Station   uses   a   low   power   radio   frequency   transmitter.   The   concentrated   energy   from   an   antenna   may   pose   a   health   hazard.   People   should   not   be   in   front   of   the   antenna   when   the   transmitter   is   operating.     The   installer   of   this   equipment   must   ensure   the   antenna   is   located   or   pointed   such   that   it   does   not   emit   an   RF   field   in   excess   of   Health   Canada   limits   for   the   general   population.   Recommended   safety   guidelines   for   the   human   exposure   to   radio   frequency   electromagnetic   energy   are   contained   in   the   Canadian   Safety   Code   6   (available   from   Health   Canada)   and   the   Federal   Communications   Commission   (FCC)   Bulletin   65.     Any   changes   or   modifications   not   expressly   approved   by   the   party   responsible   for   compliance   (in   the   country   where   used)   could   void   the   user's   authority   to   operate   the   equipment.     MAXIMUM   EIRP   FCC   Regulations   allow   up   to   36dBm   Effective   Isotropic   Radiated   Power   (EIRP).    Therefore,   the   sum   of   the   transmitted   power   (in   dBm),   the   cabling   loss   and   the   antenna   gain   cannot   exceed   36dBm.

62.   62   |   Page     APPENDIX   B:   PRODUCT   WARRANTY     CalAmp   warrants   to   the   original   purchaser   for   use   ("Buyer")   that   data   telemetry   products   manufactured   by   DRL   ("Products")   are   free   from   defects   in   material   and   workmanship   and   will   conform   to   DRL's   published   technical   specifications   for   a   period   of,   except   as   noted   below,   one   (1)   year   from   the   date   of   shipment   to   Buyer.   DRL   makes   no   warranty   with   respect   to   any   equipment   not   manufactured   by   DRL,   and   any   such   equipment   shall   carry   the   original   equipment   manufacturer's   warranty   only.   DRL   further   makes   no   warranty   as   to   and   specifically   disclaims   liability   for,   availability,   range,   coverage,   grade   of   service   or   operation   of   the   repeater   system   provided   by   the   carrier   or   repeater   operator.   Any   return   shipping   charges   for   third   party   equipment   to   their   respective   repair   facilities   are   chargeable   and   will   be   passed   on   to   the   Buyer.   If   any   Product   fails   to   meet   the   warranty   set   forth   above   during   the   applicable   warranty   period   and   is   returned   to   a   location   designated   by   DRL.   DRL,   at   its   option,   shall   either   repair   or   replace   such   defective   Product,   directly   or   through   an   authorized   service   agent,   within   thirty   (30)   days   of   receipt   of   same.   No   Products   may   be   returned   without   prior   authorization   from   DRL.   Any   repaired   or   replaced   Products   shall   be   warranted   for   the   remainder   of   the   original   warranty   period.   Buyer   shall   pay   all   shipping   charges,   handling   charges,   fees   and   duties   for   returning   defective   Products   to   DRL   or   DRL's   authorized   service   agent.   DRL   will   pay   the   return   shipping   charges   if   the   Product   is   repaired   or   replaced   under   warranty,   exclusive   of   fees   and   duties.   Repair   or   replacement   of   defective   Products   as   set   forth   in   this   paragraph   fulfills   any   and   all   warranty   obligations   on   the   part   of   DRL.   This   warranty   is   void   and   DRL   shall   not   be   obligated   to   replace   or   repair   any   Products   if   (i)   the   Product   has   been   used   in   other   than   its   normal   and   customary   manner;   (ii)   the   Product   has   been   subject   to   misuse,   accident,   neglect   or   damage   or   has   been   used   other   than   with   DRL   approved   accessories   and   equipment;   (iii)   unauthorized   alteration   or   repairs   have   been   made   or   unapproved   parts   have   been   used   in   or   with   the   Product;   or   (iv)   Buyer   failed   to   notify   DRL   or   DRL's   authorized   service   agent   of   the   defect   during   the   applicable   warranty   period.   DRL   is   the   final   arbiter   of   such   claims.    THE   AFORESAID   WARRANTIES   ARE   IN   LIEU   OF   ALL   OTHER   WARRANTIES,   EXPRESSED   AND   IMPLIED,   INCLUDING   BUT   NOT   LIMITED   TO,   ANY   IMPLIED   WARRANTY   OF   MERCHANTABILITY   OR   FITNESS   FOR   A   PARTICULAR   PURPOSE.   DRL   AND   BUYER   AGREE   THAT   BUYER'S   EXCLUSIVE   REMEDY   FOR   ANY   BREACH   OF   ANY   OF   SAID   WARRANTIES   IT   AS   SET   FORTH   ABOVE.   BUYER   AGREES   THAT   IN   NO   EVENT   SHALL   DRL   BE   LIABLE   FOR   INCIDENTAL,   CONSEQUENTIAL,   SPECIAL,   INDIRECT   OR   EXEMPLARY   DAMAGES   WHETHER   ON   THE   BASIS   OF   NEGLIGENCE,   STRICT   LIABILITY   OR   OTHERWISE.   The   purpose   of   the   exclusive   remedies   set   forth   above   shall   be   to   provide   Buyer   with   repair   or   replacement   of   non ‐ complying   Products   in   the   manner   provided   above.   These   exclusive   remedies   shall   not   be   deemed   to   have   failed   of   their   essential   purpose   so   long   as   DRL   is   willing   and   able   to   repair   or   replace   non ‐ complying   Products   in   the   manner   set   forth   above.   This   warranty   applies   to   all   Products   sold   worldwide.   Some   states   do   not   allow   limitations   on   implied   warranties   so   the   above   limitations   may   not   be   applicable.   You   may   also   have   other   rights,   which   vary   from   state   to   state.   EXCEPTIONS   THIRTY   DAY:    Tuning   and   adjustment   of   telemetry   radios    NO   WARRANTY:    Fuses,   lamps   and   other   expendable   parts  

46.   46   |   Page     Destination   Port:   Enter   the   destination   port   to   match.   Leave   as   0   to   ignore   the   destination   port.    DSCP:   Select   the   differentiated   services   code   point   to   match.    Protocol:   IP   traffic   can   be   filtered   by   protocol.   Select   the   protocol   to   match:   TCP,   UDP,   ICMP,   or   all   protocols.   If   TCP   is   selected   the   ACKs   checkbox   is   enabled.   Checking   this   box   creates   a   filter   that   matches   TCP   Acks   only.   Unchecking   this   box   creates   a   filter   that   matches   all   types   of   TCP   traffic.   Queue:   Sets   the   queue   that   traffic   matching   the   filter   will   go   into.    6.9.4 FILTER   TABLE   The   filter   table   displays   a   list   of   all   filters   that   have   been   created.   Filters   that   are   currently   enabled   will   be   shown   in   bold.    A   filter   is   disabled   if   it   is   associated   with   a   disabled   queue.   Traffic   will   be   checked   against   each   filter   in   this   table   starting   at   the   top   and   working   towards   the   bottom.   Once   a   packet   is   found   to   match   a   given   filter,   the   packet   is   placed   into   the   specified   queue.   When   a   packet   is   found   to   match   a   given   filter,   filter   comparison   stops   and   filters   further   down   the   table   are   ignored.   When   the   next   packet   is   received   the   process   starts   over   from   the   top   of   the   table.   Click   the   up   or   down   arrows   to   move   a   filter   in   the   list.   Click   "X"   to   delete   a   filter   or   Delete   All   to   remove   all   the   filters.   New   filters   will   be   added   to   the   bottom   of   this   list.   SETUP   TIPS    Only   traffic   from   the   LAN   to   the   radio   network   will   be   throttled.     Packets   are   prioritized   and   buffered   in   the   Base   Station   controller,   not   in   the   radio.   When   packets   are   released   from   the   QoS   module   they   are   sent   to   the   radio.    In   order   to   properly   throttle   traffic,   the   QoS   module   must   be   the   slowest   point   in   your   system.   When   the   QoS   rates   are   set   too   high,   the   radio   system   may   not   be   able   to   keep   up.   In   this   scenario   traffic   will   be   backed   up   at   the   radio   interface,   waiting   for   the   RF   channel   to   free   up.    When   a   waiting   line   of   packets   forms   at   the   radio’s   RF   interface,   the   user’s   high   priority   traffic   will   not   be   allowed   to   jump   to   the   front   of   the   line   and   will   be   delayed.   To   ensure   that   high   priority   traffic   is   in   fact   given   a   high   priority,   the   rates   set   in   the   QoS   module   must   be   the   limiting   point   in   the   network.    Many   factors,   such   as   packet   size,   network   topology,   radio   collision   avoidance   settings,   very   low   RF   signal   levels   and   over   the   air   data   rate,   will   have   an   effect   on   the   overall   throughput   of   your   system.   The   outgoing   throughput   of   your   system   can   be   measured   by   setting   up   the   desired   filters   and   setting   all   the   QoS   rates   very   high.   Next,   allow   the   system   to   run   for   a   while.   The   QoS   module   will   not   throttle   traffic   since   the   rates   are   set   very   high.    After   enough   time   has   elapsed   to   build   a   representative   traffic   profile,   check   the   QoS   Statistics   web   page   (detailed   below)   and   observe   the   unthrottled   Rate   reported   for   each   queue.   This   can   be   helpful   information   to   have   when   setting   up   the   QoS   rules   for   the   initial   trials.   For   example,   to   increase   the   amount   of   bandwidth   available   for   high   priority   traffic,   low   priority   traffic   must   be   throttled   to   rates   slower   than   those   measured   during   this   initial   test.   Actual   radio   throughput   can   sometimes   be   optimized   depending   on   the   network   topology   and   characteristics   of   traffic   being   transmitted   over   the   air.   Collision   avoidance   techniques,   RF   back   off   algorithms,   RF   Acks/RF   retries   are   not   needed   in   all   networks.   While   all   of   these   features   have   definite   benefits   in   certain   situations   they   can   also   slow   throughput.   These   settings   can   sometimes   be   optimized   to   yield   a   greater   throughput.    See   the   radio’s   user   manual   or   contact   CalAmp   technical   services   for   more   details.  

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